Simplicity in Complexity: An Introduction to Complex Systems

Simplicity Research Institute
2
Free sample

How do scientists model crowd behaviour, epidemics, earthquakes or the internet?
 
What can we learn from the collective intelligence and adaptability
of an ant colony?
 
This book answers such questions by highlighting common themes in
the study of complex systems. 
 
Topics covered include self-organisation, emergence, agent-based
simulations, complex networks, phase plane plots, fractals, chaos,
measures of complexity, model building, and the scientific method. 
 
Explanations are simple and concise, with common misconceptions
clarified. Numerous exercises help enthusiasts consolidate their
understanding through peer learning.
 
Supplementary resources are at the companion websites
www.simplicitysg.net/books and www.facebook.com/simcomty. 
  


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About the author

About the Author:
Dr. Rajesh Parwani tested the modules `Simplicity' and `Complexity'
for more than a decade on willing undergraduates in a multi-
disciplinary programme. This book summarises the content of
those experiments.

His other books are `Integrated Mathematics for Explorers' (with Adeline Ng) and `Real World Mathematics' (with Dr. W.K. Ng).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Simplicity Research Institute
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Published on
Jan 28, 2015
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Pages
140
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ISBN
9789810939335
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / System Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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