Foreign Aid and the Legacy of Harry S. Truman

Truman Legacy Series

Book 10
Truman State University Press
Free sample

President Harry S. Truman once said that if he were remembered for anything, it would be for his foreign aid programs. Despite the fragmented appearance of the Truman administration’s various foreign aid programs, they were all inspired by a clear policy “to assist free peoples to work out their own destinies in their own way,” and with the clear purpose of helping create conditions throughout the world compatible with American values and interests. From the Marshall Plan to the Truman Doctrine to the Point Four program, this volume explores the legacy of Truman’s institutionalization of foreign aid as a central feature of American foreign policy. Truman's idea that the United States should assist underdeveloped or developing countries to build up their economies is an enduring legacy that shapes United States foreign policy to the present day and beyond.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Truman State University Press
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Published on
Feb 19, 2015
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Pages
344
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ISBN
9781612481234
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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