Observations on Reversionary Payments: On Schemes for Providing Annuities for Widows, and for Persons in Old Age : on the Method of Calculating the Values of Assurances on Lives : and on the National Debt : Also, Essays on Different Subjects in the Doctrine of Life-annuities and Political Arithmetic ...

T. Cadell
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
T. Cadell
Read more
Published on
Dec 31, 1792
Read more
Pages
532
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Eighteen years ago, Richard Price's first novel, The Wanderers, was hailed by Hubert Selby, Jr., in the New York Times Book Review as "an outstanding work of art." Three novels and a dozen years later, Price made an equally stunning debut in Hollywood with his screenplay for The Color of Money, which was nominated for an Academy Award. And in 1989 his script for Sea of Love was widely recognized as a key to that movie's great success. But none of these accomplishments prepares us for the power and the brilliance of his new novel: with Clockers, Richard Price takes a long step forward and joins the first rank of American writers. Rocco Klein, a veteran homicide detective in a city just outside Manhattan, has lost his appetite for the wild drama of the street. When a warm June night brings yet another drug murder, Rocco has no sense that the case is anything special. A black twenty-year-old steps forward to confess, but a little digging reveals that he's never been in any kind of trouble, whereas his brother runs a crew of street-corner cocaine dealers— clockers—in a nearby housing project. Soon Rocco is sure that Victor Dunham is innocent, sure that his brother Strike is the real killer, and suddenly Rocco's hunger for the job is back.

But we know this brother, and we know Strike is not the killer. Driven and shrewd, Strike uses violence when he has to, but his primary concern is survival. He has been clocking for almost a year; if he could somehow move up to the ounce business, he might get off the street before it breaks him. But then Rocco Klein begins hounding him, and Strike's life becomes a nightmare.

At once an explosive murder mystery and a riveting portrait of two lives on a collision course, Clockers is a spectacular achievement. Richard Price has given voice to the harrowing but vital landscape of the American inner city, and this is quite simply one of the best novels in years.
In 1998, Richard Price returned to the gritty urban landscape of his national bestseller Clockers to produce Freedomland, a searing and unforgettable novel about a hijacked car, a missing child, and an embattled neighborhood polarized by racism, distrust, and accusation.  Freedomland hit bestseller lists from coast to coast, including those of the Boston Globe, USA Today and Los Angeles Times; garnered universally rave reviews; and was selected as the Grand Prize Winner of the Imus American Book Award and as a New York Times Notable Book.  On May 11, this highly lauded bestseller is available in paperback for the first time.

A white woman, her hands gashed and bloody, stumbles into an inner-city emergency room and announces that she has just been carjacked by a black man. But then comes the horrifying twist: Her young son was asleep in the back seat, and he has now disappeared into the night.

So begins Richard Price's electrifying new novel, a tale set on the same turf--Dempsey, New Jersey--as Clockers. Assigned to investigate the case of Brenda Martin's missing child is detective Lorenzo Council, a local son of the very housing project targeted as the scene of the crime. Under a white-hot media glare, Lorenzo launches an all-out search for the abducted boy, even as he quietly explores a different possibility: Does Brenda Martin know a lot more about her son's disappearance than she's admitting?

Right behind Lorenzo is Jesse Haus, an ambitious young reporter from the city's evening paper. Almost immediately, Jesse suspects Brenda of hiding something. Relentlessly, she works her way into the distraught mother's fragile world, befriending her even as she looks for the chance to break the biggest story of her career.

As the search for the alleged carjacker intensifies, so does the simmering racial tension between Dempsey and its mostly white neighbor, Gannon. And when the Gannon police arrest a black man from Dempsey and declare him a suspect, the animosity between the two cities threatens to boil over into violence. With the media swarming and the mood turning increasingly ugly, Lorenzo must take desperate measures to get to the bottom of Brenda Martin's story.

At once a suspenseful mystery and a brilliant portrait of two cities locked in a death-grip of explosive rage, Freedomland reveals the heart of the urban American experience--dislocated, furious, yearning--as never before. Richard Price has created a vibrant, gut-wrenching masterpiece whose images will remain long after the final, devastating pages.


From the Paperback edition.
This book explores Basil Bunting's continued reputation and influence in modern British poetry, and also the impact of a peculiarly 'Northern' inflection of Modernism (which Bunting largely defined) within the varieties of poetry being written in Britain today. The editors asked a variety of English, Scottish, Welsh and American poets and academics to reflect upon the themes, implications, impact or example of Bunting's work in the centenary year of his birth, looking back on the beginnings of Modernism at the start of the twentieth century into which he was born, or forward into the twenty-first century in which he continues to be read and learned from: a true poetic star to steer by. The resulting collection of fourteen new essays reveals the continued ability of Bunting's poetry both to delight and to challenge. Topics covered include the nature of influence; Celtic and Northumbrian contexts for the modern English long poem; prosodic patterns in early Bunting; Bunting as a reader of his own work; narrative sources in his poetry; the problem of patronage; his 'rueful masculinity'; women poets and Bunting; radical landscape poetry; his translations from the Persian Hafiz and the Roman Horace; economic and social tensions in his work; the poet as 'makar'; and a previously unpublished selection of his letters from the 1960s to the 1980s, commenting upon his own and others' poetry and on the political condition of Britain in those years. The collection will be of interest to teachers and readers of twentieth century English and American poetry, and to those exploring the processes of literary translation. Contributors include David Annwn, Richard Caddel, Roy Fisher, Victoria Forde, Harry Gilonis, Ian Gregson, Philip Hobsbaum, Parvin Loloi, James McGonigal, Richard Price, Glynn Pursglove, Harriet Tarlo, Gael Turnbull, and Jonathan Williams.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.