One Native Life

D & M Publishers
3
Free sample

One Native Life is a look back down the road Richard Wagamese has traveled — from childhood abuse to adult alcoholism — in reclaiming his identity. It’s about what he has learned as a human being, a man, and an Ojibway in his 52 years on Earth. Whether he’s writing about playing baseball, running away with the circus, making bannock, or attending a sacred bundle ceremony, these are stories told in a healing spirit. Through them, Wagamese shows readers how to appreciate life for the journey it is.
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About the author

Richard Wagamese is an Ojibway from the Wabasseemoong First Nation in northwestern Ontario. He is the author of three novels: Keeper’n Me, A Quality of Light and the award-winning Dream Wheels. His autobiographical book For Joshua was published to critical acclaim in 2002.

Richard Wagamese has worked as a newpaper reporter and a broadcaster for radio and TV. His columns for the Calgary Herald won a National Newspaper Award in 1990. He lives outside Kamloops, British Columbia.
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Additional Information

Publisher
D & M Publishers
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Published on
Jul 1, 2009
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9781926685762
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / Native American & Aboriginal
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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