Geomorphology: The Mechanics and Chemistry of Landscapes

Cambridge University Press
2
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This textbook provides a modern, quantitative and process-oriented approach to equip students with the tools to understand geomorphology. Insight into the interpretation of landscapes is developed from basic principles and simple models, and by stepping through the equations that capture the essence of the mechanics and chemistry of landscapes. Boxed worked examples and real-world applications bring the subject to life for students, allowing them to apply the theory to their own experience. The book covers cutting edge topics, including the revolutionary cosmogenic nuclide dating methods and modeling, highlights links to other Earth sciences through up-to-date summaries of current research, and illustrates the importance of geomorphology in understanding environmental changes. Setting up problems as a conservation of mass, ice, soil, or heat, this book arms students with tools to fully explore processes, understand landscapes, and to participate in this rapidly evolving field.
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About the author

Bob Anderson has taught geomorphology since 1988, first at University of California, Santa Cruz, and now at University of Colorado, Boulder. Bob has now studied most parts of landscapes, from the glaciated tips to the coastal toes, with significant attention to sediment transport mechanics, interaction of geophysical and geomorphic processes to shape mountain ranges, evolution of bedrock canyons and glaciated landscapes. He has participated in the development of a new tool kit that employs cosmogenic radionucides to establish timing in the landscape. He develops numerical models of landscapes that honor both field observations and first principles of conservation; these models in turn have served to hone his field efforts. In the course of this academic adventure, he was founding editor of Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface, co-authored the textbook Tectonic Geomorphology (2000, Wiley-Blackwell) with Doug Burbank, and has been honoured by election as a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union.

Suzanne Anderson has been on the faculty at University of Colorado, Boulder since 2004, where she teaches courses on Geomorphology, Earth Critical Zone, Landscapes and Water, and Glaciers and Permafrost. Her awards include an Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor award at University of California, Berkeley, a NASA Graduate Student Fellowship in Global Change Research, and an NSF Earth Sciences Post-doctoral Fellowship. Suzanne research has taken her to Svalbard, Alaska, Oregon and Nepal, and has focused on interactions between chemical weathering, hydrology, and physical erosion mechanisms. She currently directs the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, an NSF environmental observatory based at the University of Colorado and involving researchers from four institutions and agencies. Suzanne was editor of Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine Research from 2004006, and served as an associate editor of Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface from 2002006.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Jun 17, 2010
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Pages
655
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ISBN
9781139788700
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Earth Sciences / Geography
Science / Earth Sciences / Geology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Tectonic geomorphology is the study of the interplay between tectonic and surface processes that shape the landscape in regions of active deformation and at time scales ranging from days to millions of years.  Over the past decade, recent advances in the quantification of both rates and the physical basis of tectonic and surface processes have underpinned an explosion of new research in the field of tectonic geomorphology. Modern tectonic geomorphology is an exceptionally integrative field that utilizes techniques and data derived from studies of geomorphology, seismology, geochronology, structure, geodesy, stratigraphy, meteorology and Quaternary science. While integrating new insights and highlighting controversies from the ten years of research since the 1st edition, this 2nd edition of Tectonic Geomorphology reviews the fundamentals of the subject, including the nature of faulting and folding, the creation and use of geomorphic markers for tracing deformation, chronological techniques that are used to date events and quantify rates, geodetic techniques for defining recent deformation, and paleoseismologic approaches to calibrate past deformation.

 

Overall, this book focuses on the current understanding of the dynamic interplay between surface processes and active tectonics. As it ranges from the timescales of individual earthquakes to the growth and decay of mountain belts, this book provides a timely synthesis of modern research for upper-level undergraduate and graduate earth science students and for practicing geologists.

Additional resources for this book can be found at: www.wiley.com/go/burbank/geomorphology.  

Tectonic geomorphology is the study of the interplay between tectonic and surface processes that shape the landscape in regions of active deformation. Recent advances in the quantification of rates and physical basis of tectonic and surface processes have rejuvenated the field of tectonic geomorphology. Modern tectonic geomorphology is an exciting and highly integrative field which utilizes techniques and data derived from studies of geomorphology, seismology, geochronology, structure, geodesy, and Quaternary climate change. While emphasizing new insights from the last decade of research, Tectonic Geomorphology reviews the fundamentals of the subject which include the nature of faulting and folding, the creation and use of geomorphic markers for tracing deformation, chronological techniques which date deformation, geodetic techniques for defining recent deformation, and paleoseismologic approaches to calibrate past deformation.

The overall focus of this book is on new interpretations of landform evolution and insights on the interplay between surface processes and tectonics that emerge from integrative studies. The authors have developed an up-to-date interpretation of landscapes in tectonically active environments for upper-level undergraduate and graduate earth science students and practicing geologists.

For an instructor's image bank, please visit:

http://www.geol.ucsb.edu/faculty/burbank

First text to take a broad interdisciplinary approach: integrated geomorphology, geophysics, and paleoclimatology.


Includes the latest technological advances used in dating: Uranium series and dating and observation.
Emphasizes the role of surface processes.
Focuses on landscapes at different time scales.
Provides strong coverage on numerical modeling of tectonically active landscapes.
Presents the recent approaches to calibrating rates of uplift and erosion.
Stresses the tectonics of active plate margins in a detailed yet succinct way.
Contains "Chapter introductions," "Chapter summaries," and "References" that reinforce principles and theory as well as provide additional background information.
Tectonic geomorphology is the study of the interplay between tectonic and surface processes that shape the landscape in regions of active deformation and at time scales ranging from days to millions of years.  Over the past decade, recent advances in the quantification of both rates and the physical basis of tectonic and surface processes have underpinned an explosion of new research in the field of tectonic geomorphology. Modern tectonic geomorphology is an exceptionally integrative field that utilizes techniques and data derived from studies of geomorphology, seismology, geochronology, structure, geodesy, stratigraphy, meteorology and Quaternary science. While integrating new insights and highlighting controversies from the ten years of research since the 1st edition, this 2nd edition of Tectonic Geomorphology reviews the fundamentals of the subject, including the nature of faulting and folding, the creation and use of geomorphic markers for tracing deformation, chronological techniques that are used to date events and quantify rates, geodetic techniques for defining recent deformation, and paleoseismologic approaches to calibrate past deformation.

 

Overall, this book focuses on the current understanding of the dynamic interplay between surface processes and active tectonics. As it ranges from the timescales of individual earthquakes to the growth and decay of mountain belts, this book provides a timely synthesis of modern research for upper-level undergraduate and graduate earth science students and for practicing geologists.

Additional resources for this book can be found at: www.wiley.com/go/burbank/geomorphology.  

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