Catholicism in the American West: A Rosary of Hidden Voices

Texas A&M University Press
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Like the rosary itself, the influence of Catholicism on the social and historical development of the American West has been both visible and hidden: visible in the effects of personal conviction on lives and communities; hidden in that the fuller context of this important American religious group has been largely marginalized or undervalued in traditional historiographic treatments of the region.

This volume, an outgrowth of the 2004 Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures, seeks to redress this imbalance. Editors Roberto R. Treviño and Richard Francaviglia have assembled here a variety of scholarly voices to present, according to the preface, "little-known stories about a religion whose traditions and adherents had until recently remained largely at the periphery of U.S. history narratives.” The result is a work that offers at once a fuller portrait of the Catholic experience in and impact on the American West, and also tantalizing glimpses that are highly suggestive of fruitful areas for further study.

The contributors to Catholicism in the American West bring to light the variety, the hardships, and, ultimately, some of the triumphs of Catholicism in the American West. These studies are fine examples of the scholarship currently "reshaping how historians understand the role of Catholicism both in the development of the West and in the broader history of the nation.”
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About the author

ROBERTO R. TREVIÑO is an associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Arlington. His Ph.D. is from Stanford University.RICHARD V. FRANCAVIGLIA is a professor of history and director of the Center for Southwestern Studies at the University of Texas at Arlington. He previously coedited Lights, Camera, History: Portraying the Past in Film
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Additional Information

Texas A&M University Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2007
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History / Americas (North, Central, South, West Indies)
Religion / Christianity / Catholic
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