Clarissa Harlowe or the History of a Young Lady (Complete)

Library of Alexandria
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Publisher
Library of Alexandria
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Published on
Dec 31, 1793
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Pages
4981
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ISBN
9781465528759
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Features
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Language
English
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This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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'Pamela under the Notion of being a Virtuous Modest Girl will be introduced into all Familes,and when she gets there, what Scenes does she represent? Why a fine young Gentleman endeavouring to debauch a beautiful young Girl of Sixteen.' (Pamela Censured, 1741) One of the most spectacular successes of the burgeoning literary marketplace of eighteeent-century London, Pamela also marked a defining moment in the emergence of the modern novel. In the words of one contemporary, it divided the world 'into two different Parties, Pamelists and Antipamelists', even eclipsing the sensational factional politics of the day. Preached up for its morality, and denounced as pornography in disguise, it vividly describes a young servant's long resistance to the attempts of her predatory master to seduce her. Written in the voice of its low-born heroine, but by a printer who fifteen years earlier had narrowly escaped imprisonment for the seditious output of his press, Pamela is not only a work of pioneering psychological complexity, but also a compelling and provocative study of power and its abuse. Based on the original text of 1740, from which Richardson later retreated in a series of defensive revisions, this edition makes available the version of Pamela that aroused such widespread controversy on its first appearance. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
 Regarded by some as the leading novelist of the Eighteenth Century, Samuel Richardson is best known for his epistolary novels, which changed the course of English literature. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete works of Samuel Richardson, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Richardson’s life and works
* Concise introductions to the novels and other texts
* ALL 4 novels, with individual contents tables
* Images of how the books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* The complete translation of AESOP’S FABLES, first time in digital print
* Special numerical and alphabetical contents tables for the fables
* Includes Richardson’s non-fiction, with rare essays - spend hours exploring the author’s wide range of texts
* Special criticism section, with essays evaluating Richardson’s contribution to literature
* Features two biographies, including Thomson’s seminal study - discover Richardson’s literary life
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

CONTENTS:

The Novels
PAMELA; OR, VIRTUE REWARDED
PAMELA IN HER EXALTED CONDITION
CLARISSA; OR THE HISTORY OF A YOUNG LADY
THE HISTORY OF SIR CHARLES GRANDISON

The Fables
AESOP’S FABLES

The Non-Fiction
THE INFIDEL CONVICTED
THE APPRENTICE’S VADE MECUM
THE SEASONABLE EXAMINATION OF THE PLEAS AND PRETENSIONS
LETTERS WRITTEN TO AND FOR PARTICULAR FRIENDS
A TOUR THRO’ THE WHOLE ISLAND OF GREAT BRITAIN
COPY OF LETTER TO A LADY, WHO WAS SOLICITOUS FOR AN ADDITIONAL VOLUME TO THE HISTORY OF SIR CHARLES GRANDISON
ANSWER TO A LETTER FROM A FRIEND
SIX ORIGINAL LETTERS UPON DUELLING
PREFACE TO AUBIN: A COLLECTION OF ENTERTAINING HISTORIES AND NOVELS

The Poetry
A VERSE FROM THE GENTLEMAN S MAGAZINE

The Criticism
REMARKS ON CLARISSA, &c. by Sarah Fielding
THE ENGLISH NOVELISTS by William Hazlitt

The Biographies
THE LIFE OF SAMUEL RICHARDSON by Sir Walter Scott
SAMUEL RICHARDSON: A BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL STUDY by Clara Linklater Thomson

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

 Clarissa Harlowe, the tragic heroine of Clarissa, is a beautiful and virtuous young lady whose family has become wealthy only recently and now desires to become part of the aristocracy. Their original plan was to concentrate the wealth and lands of the Harlowes into the possession of Clarissa's brother James Harlowe, whose wealth and political power will lead to his being granted a title. Clarissa's grandfather leaves her a substantial piece of property upon his death, and a new route to the nobility opens through Clarissa marrying Robert Lovelace, heir to an earldom. James's response is to provoke a duel with Lovelace, who is seen thereafter as the family's enemy. James also proposes that Clarissa marry Roger Solmes, who is willing to trade properties with James to concentrate James's holdings and speed his becoming Lord Harlowe. The family agrees and attempts to force Clarissa to marry Solmes, whom she finds physically disgusting as well as boorish.

Desperate to remain free, she begins a correspondence with Lovelace. When her family's campaign to force her marriage reaches its height, Lovelace tricks her into eloping with him. Joseph Leman, the Harlowes' servant, shouts and makes noise so it may seem like the family has awoken and discovered that Clarissa and Lovelace are about to run away. Frightened of the possible aftermath, Clarissa leaves with Lovelace but becomes his prisoner for many months. She is kept at many lodgings and even a brothel, where the women are disguised as high-class ladies by Lovelace himself. She refuses to marry him on many occasions, longing to live by herself in peace. She eventually runs away but Lovelace finds her and tricks her into returning to the brothel.
Lovelace intends to marry Clarissa to avenge her family's treatment of him and wants to possess her body as well as her mind. He believes if she loses her virtue, she will be forced to marry him on any terms. As he is more and more impressed by Clarissa, he finds it difficult to believe that virtuous women do not exist.

The pressure he finds himself under, combined with his growing passion for Clarissa, drives him to extremes and eventually he rapes her by drugging her. Through this action, Clarissa must accept and marry Lovelace. It is suspected that Mrs. Sinclair (the brothel manager) and the other prostitutes assist Lovelace during the rape.

Lovelace's action backfires and Clarissa is ever more adamantly opposed to marrying a vile and corrupt individual like Lovelace. Eventually, Clarissa manages to escape from the brothel but Lovelace finds her and by deception manages to get her back to the brothel. She escapes a second time, is jailed for a few days following a charge by the brothel owner for unpaid bills, is released and finds sanctuary with a shopkeeper and his wife. She lives in constant fear of again being accosted by Lovelace who, through one of his close associates and also a libertine – John Belford – as well as through his own family members, continues to offer her marriage, to which she is determined not to accede. She becomes dangerously ill due to the mental duress.

As her illness progresses, she and John Belford become friends and she appoints him the executor of her will. She is dying and is determined to accept it and proceeds to get all her affairs in order. Belford is amazed at the way Clarissa handles her approaching death and laments what Lovelace has done. In one of the many letters sent to Lovelace he writes "if the divine Clarissa asks me to slit thy throat, Lovelace, I shall do it in an instance." Eventually, surrounded by strangers and her cousin Col. Morden, Clarissa dies in the full consciousness of her virtue and trusting in a better life after death. Belford manages Clarissa's will and ensures that all her articles and money go into the hands of the individuals she desires should receive them.

Lovelace departs for Europe and his correspondence with his friend Belford continues. During their correspondence Lovelace learns that Col. Morden has suggested he might seek out Lovelace and demand satisfaction on behalf of his cousin. He responds that he is not able to accept threats against himself and arranges an encounter with Col. Morden. They meet in Munich and arrange a duel. The duel takes place, both are injured, Morden slightly, but Lovelace dies of his injuries the following day. Before dying he says "let this expiate!"

Clarissa's relatives finally realise the misery they have caused but discover that they are too late and Clarissa has already died. The story ends with an account of the fate of the other characters.
'Pamela under the Notion of being a Virtuous Modest Girl will be introduced into all Familes,and when she gets there, what Scenes does she represent? Why a fine young Gentleman endeavouring to debauch a beautiful young Girl of Sixteen.' (Pamela Censured, 1741) One of the most spectacular successes of the burgeoning literary marketplace of eighteeent-century London, Pamela also marked a defining moment in the emergence of the modern novel. In the words of one contemporary, it divided the world 'into two different Parties, Pamelists and Antipamelists', even eclipsing the sensational factional politics of the day. Preached up for its morality, and denounced as pornography in disguise, it vividly describes a young servant's long resistance to the attempts of her predatory master to seduce her. Written in the voice of its low-born heroine, but by a printer who fifteen years earlier had narrowly escaped imprisonment for the seditious output of his press, Pamela is not only a work of pioneering psychological complexity, but also a compelling and provocative study of power and its abuse. Based on the original text of 1740, from which Richardson later retreated in a series of defensive revisions, this edition makes available the version of Pamela that aroused such widespread controversy on its first appearance. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
 Regarded by some as the leading novelist of the Eighteenth Century, Samuel Richardson is best known for his epistolary novels, which changed the course of English literature. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete works of Samuel Richardson, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Richardson’s life and works
* Concise introductions to the novels and other texts
* ALL 4 novels, with individual contents tables
* Images of how the books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* The complete translation of AESOP’S FABLES, first time in digital print
* Special numerical and alphabetical contents tables for the fables
* Includes Richardson’s non-fiction, with rare essays - spend hours exploring the author’s wide range of texts
* Special criticism section, with essays evaluating Richardson’s contribution to literature
* Features two biographies, including Thomson’s seminal study - discover Richardson’s literary life
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

CONTENTS:

The Novels
PAMELA; OR, VIRTUE REWARDED
PAMELA IN HER EXALTED CONDITION
CLARISSA; OR THE HISTORY OF A YOUNG LADY
THE HISTORY OF SIR CHARLES GRANDISON

The Fables
AESOP’S FABLES

The Non-Fiction
THE INFIDEL CONVICTED
THE APPRENTICE’S VADE MECUM
THE SEASONABLE EXAMINATION OF THE PLEAS AND PRETENSIONS
LETTERS WRITTEN TO AND FOR PARTICULAR FRIENDS
A TOUR THRO’ THE WHOLE ISLAND OF GREAT BRITAIN
COPY OF LETTER TO A LADY, WHO WAS SOLICITOUS FOR AN ADDITIONAL VOLUME TO THE HISTORY OF SIR CHARLES GRANDISON
ANSWER TO A LETTER FROM A FRIEND
SIX ORIGINAL LETTERS UPON DUELLING
PREFACE TO AUBIN: A COLLECTION OF ENTERTAINING HISTORIES AND NOVELS

The Poetry
A VERSE FROM THE GENTLEMAN S MAGAZINE

The Criticism
REMARKS ON CLARISSA, &c. by Sarah Fielding
THE ENGLISH NOVELISTS by William Hazlitt

The Biographies
THE LIFE OF SAMUEL RICHARDSON by Sir Walter Scott
SAMUEL RICHARDSON: A BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL STUDY by Clara Linklater Thomson

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

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