Dangerous Games: Faces, Incidents, and Casualties of the Cold War

Naval Institute Press
3
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Reminding readers that the Cold War was actually a time of hot wars, spying, murders, defections, shoot downs of reconnaissance aircraft, and a space race, the authors uncover some unknown or long-forgotten incidents of the period. Among them, the murder of a U.S. naval attache on the Orient Express, an East German soldier s leap to the West in Berlin, two CIA officers twenty years in a Chinese prison, Cpt. Bert Mizusawa s rescue under fire of a Soviet defector in the Korean DMZ, a North Korean pilot s defection in a MiG fighter, the USS Forrestal fire, and the Soviets putting the first man in space.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Naval Institute Press
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Published on
Sep 2, 2013
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781612514529
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / United States
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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