Pumpkin Chucking: Poems

Able Muse Press
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 Stephen Scaer’s Pumpkin Chucking is a harvest of wit and enlightenment, gleaned from everyday situations. Scaer shows impressive formal dexterity, and inventive use of nonce and received forms—sonnet, double-dactyl, Old-English-style alliterative meter; he turns the limerick on its head as it transforms into a humor-laden meditative tool in sequences such as “Mid-Life Limericks” and “Classical Limericks.” Scaer’s delivery is immediate, simple but never simplistic, laying bare the human condition to reveal that “The triumphs that [we] seek/ are held for their own sake,/ and shower us with grace/ like petals on the grass.” This finalist for the 2012 Able Muse Book Award is a rare achievement in its deft marriage of the lighthearted and sublime. It is a book to relish from start to finish.

PRAISE FOR PUMPKIN CHUCKING:

Right from the opening sonnet in Pumpkin Chucking, the poignant “Hannah at Ten,” you’ll recognize Scaer as an outstanding lyric poet. But the prevailing voice in  this collection belongs to a hugely entertaining, middle-aged, middle-class Everyman writing about the everyday. Take the lifeguard, sung in Old-English-style alliterative meter—“whistle-whirler,” “Thane of the Poconos.” Or the Hercules who can divert rivers into Augean stables with no hassles from the EPA. (And both of these pale compared to Scaer’s “Classical Limericks.”)
     Some of the poems are exquisitely lyrical: “Light Box,” “Raspberry Patch,” “Long Trail.” Still, what you take away from the book is Scaer’s deadpan humor—a wit that’s wicked but not mean. Often as not, the speaker is himself the target. And the more the guy makes fun of himself, the more we love him. He speaks for us all.
—Deborah Warren

Stephen Scaer’s Pumpkin Chucking celebrates the New England landscape while still being universal . . . and it surprises us with wit in the winking way of Frost.
—A.M. Juster (from the foreword)

A collection with a range of forms as broad as Stephen Scaer’s Pumpkin Chucking can read like an exercise book—or like a tour of the expressive possibilities of all of English poetry. This book is decisively the latter. From the delightful “Mid-Life Limericks” to the modern idiom shaped to Anglo-Saxon alliterative verse in “Wendell,” each poem feels utterly natural, utterly native to the form. And don’t miss “Sarcasm,” a sonnet that deftly recasts Petrarch’s jewels of transcendent love as stones that wound both lover and beloved.
—Richard Wakefield

This is a wonderful and entertaining book of poetry. Stephen Scaer’s poems are full of wit, sarcasm and humor. His subjects are familiar to many of us: parenting, tedious jobs, home repair, dealing with middle age. But his well-crafted verse—the rhymes alone are worth the price of admission—is much more than that. Reading the poems, I was reminded of the voice of Screwtape dispensing advice to his devil-in-training nephew in C.S. Lewis’s The Screwtape Letters: the humor is aimed directly at that familiar reflection in the mirror. When I was done reading and admiring these poems, I was left feeling like the narrator standing by his grill smoking a rack of ribs in Scaer’s “The Sacrifice of Cain”: “I wish I were a better man.”
—Robert Crawford

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About the author

 Stephen Scaer of Nashua, NH, is a special education teacher with poems published in National Review, First Things, Cricket, and Highlights for Children. Pumpkin Chucking was a finalist for the 2012 Able Muse Book Award.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Able Muse Press
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Published on
Jan 30, 2014
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Pages
90
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ISBN
9781927409114
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Language
English
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Genres
Humor / Form / Limericks & Verse
Poetry / American / General
Poetry / Subjects & Themes / Places
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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In May’s debut collection, poems buzz and purr like a well-oiled chassis. Grit, trial, and song thrum through tight syntax and deft prosody. From the resilient pulse of an abandoned machine to the sinuous lament of origami animals, here is the ever-changing hum that vibrates through us all, connecting one mind to the next.

“Linguistically acrobatic [and] beautifully crafted. . . [Jamaal May's] poems, exquisitely balanced by a sharp intelligence mixed with earnestness, makes his debut a marvel.” —Publishers Weekly

“The elegant and laconic intelligence in these poems, their skepticism and bent humor and deliberately anti-Romantic stance toward experience are completely refreshing. After so much contemporary writing that seems all flash, no mind and no heart, these poems show how close observation of the world and a gift for plain-spoken, but eloquent speech, can give to poetry both dignity and largeness of purpose, and do it in an idiom that is pitch perfect to emotional nuance and fine intellectual distinctions. Hard-headed and tough-minded, Hum is the epitome of what Frost meant by ‘a fresh look and a fresh listen.’” —Tom Sleigh

"Jamaal May’s debut collection, Hum, is concerned with what’s beneath the surfaces of things—the unseen that eats away at us or does the work of sustaining us. Reading these poems, I was reminded of Ellison’s ‘lower frequencies,’ a voice speaking for us all. May has a fine ear, acutely attuned to the sonic textures of everyday experience. And Hum—a meditation on the machinery of living, an extended ode to sound and silence—is a compelling debut.” —Natasha Trethewey

"In his percussive debut collection Hum, Jamaal May offers a salve for our phobias and restores the sublime to the urban landscape. Whether you need a friend to confide in, a healer to go to, or a tour guide to take you there, look no further. That low hum you hear are these poems, emanating both wisdom and swagger.” —A. Van Jordan

From "Mechanophobia: Fear of Machines":

There is no work left for the husks.
Automated welders like us,
your line replacements, can't expect
sympathy after our bright
arms of cable rust over. So come

collect us for scrap, grind us up
in the mouth of one of us.
Let your hand pry at the access
panel with the edge of a knife,
silencing the motor and thrum.


Jamaal May is a poet, editor, and filmmaker from Detroit, MI where he taught poetry in public schools and worked as a freelance audio engineer and touring performer. His poetry won the 2013 Indiana Review Poetry Prize and appears in journals such as Poetry, Ploughshares, The Believer, NER, and The Kenyon Review. Jamaal has earned an MFA from Warren Wilson College as well as fellowships from Cave Canem and The Stadler Center for Poetry at Bucknell University. He founded the Organic Weapon Arts Chapbook Press.


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