Engaged Pedagogy, Enraged Pedagogy: Reconciling Politics, Emotion, Religion, and Science for Critical Pedagogy

Transgressions

Book 69
Springer Science & Business Media
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Students, teachers and schools are under attack. The assault comes in the guise of ‘accountability’ and ‘choice’, cloaking itself in the ‘scientifically-proven’ with an over-emphasis of data. It combines a vilification of organized labor along with a promotion of the irrational, while readily blurring the line between utopia and dystopia. The attack abuses education as it disseminates self-serving propaganda, simultaneously covering up inconvenient truths like the United States government’s long and storied relationships with Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden in the Wars on Terror. It suppresses solidarity and compassion while it champions a divisive form of selfish individualism. Engaged Pedagogy, Enraged Pedagogy seeks to counter these attacks and expose the ideological impulses behind them. Marshalling critical pedagogy and an ethic of care with the notions of justified anger and the intellectual warrior, the book explores the non-antagonisitc dualisms between faith and science, reason and emotion; it deconstructs social texts ranging from ‘80s action films to dystopian literature as it uncovers the ideologies that structure and order our lives; it explores and champions the democratic potential of dialogue, mutuality, and authority, while challenging left essentialism and identity politics. The book also features an interview with Joe Kincheloe, a seminal figure in the field of critical pedagogy.
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About the author

Tony Monchinski is a freelance writer living in New York City.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Jul 23, 2011
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Pages
170
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ISBN
9789460914485
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / General
Education / Philosophy, Theory & Social Aspects
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This content is DRM protected.
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After 9/11, rightists capitalized on an atmosphere of fear and confusion to resuscitate the “culture wars” of the 1990s and once again targeted the academy. Using tactics reminiscent of the McCarthy era, religious firebrands, militant neoconservatives, and free market fundamentalists engaged in a concerted effort to silence voices critical of the ‘war on terror’ and liken legitimate dissent to treason. Brandishing a discourse of “patriotic correctness” (PC) that was informed by American ‘exceptionalism,’ Christian nationalism, anti-intellectualism, and virulent anti-liberalism, this coalition portrayed the professoriate as a dangerous cabal seeking the demise of ‘Western civilization.’ In Cold Breezes and Idiot Winds, Scatamburlo-D’Annibale explains why the most recent assault on academe must be understood in relation to the right’s broader offensive against liberalism. For decades, conservatives have worked diligently to construct a network of foundations, think tanks, and campus organizations dedicated to demonizing progressive thought, the legacy of the New Deal era, and the democratic social reforms of the 1960s. The author provides a detailed examination of this ideological infrastructure and how it advanced the agenda of PC post-9/11. She explores how the campaign for PC was aided and abetted by a right-wing media apparatus, how it continues to threaten academic freedom on campuses, and how it is currently infecting the larger body politic and contributing to the increased toxicity of the nation’s public dialogue. While purveyors of PC often invoke “culture war” rhetoric, Scatamburlo-D’Annibale adroitly reveals that their ultimate aim is to protect corporate power from any form of democratic accountability.
Tolu Olorunda is a cultural critic whose work has regularly appeared on AlterNet, Black Commentator, CounterPunch, Truthout, and several other publications including ColorLines magazine, The Nation magazine, and Wiretap magazine. His book, The Substance of Truth, takes a frank look into what has become of a society that touts grand and lofty ideals which it often fails to fulfill. With essays addressing issues as broad as the education system, 21st century media culture, Hip-Hop culture, youth culture, neoliberalism, and moral poverty, Olorunda argues the days ahead would darken in promise if rigorous action isn’t soon applied to rectify the way people think, how they respond to their surroundings, and the decisions they take to make the world better than it stands today. This struggle, he insists, could define whether or not a livable future would exist for the most vulnerable of all—children, whose plights are increasingly cast aside and ignored. From the book: “At risk of appearing alarmist, it’s easy to ignore all the warning signs hanging around us that suggest the clock is ticking fast—real fast!—and that time left for due action is short. But if life for the next generation should contain some semblance of sanity—where life itself means more than shopping malls and commodities, where Power stands accountable to the demands of communities—all fear of coming across hyperbolic would have to give way to the realities staring us down. The risk also extends to coming across Pollyannaish, as though all the impurities and iniquities holding hostage society can be cured with essays or lectures. But we cannot afford to let this moment slip by unattended, unengaged. The problems number endless—and so do the possibilities. And at no other moment has a generation been more fortunate, with the ease of technology, to make miracles happen amidst frightening circumstances. At no other moment has the clarion call blared this clearly and loudly.”
Home and exile have become key discussions in discourses of globalization, cosmopolitanism, postcolonialism, transnationalism, identity, and multiculturalism. These discourses can be expected to flourish in the future as an increasing number of multicultural scholars struggle with various kinds of displacements and the meaning of home that is thereby instantiated anew as we experience living in between cultures. This book sits in the intersection between cultural studies and performance studies. It seeks to break theoretical and empirical ground by reframing understandings of home and exile. Popular notions of exile forwarded by transnational and postcolonial scholars position home as a place of return and longing. While we believe that there are many truths in this position, we performatively seek emergent forms of displacement that are demanding new frameworks with which to enact meanings of home and exile. As Third World immigrant scholars in Western academe, we believe our move is vital in order to explore the experiences of persons, such as ourselves, who fall outside the models of displacement that have long constituted émigré writings. We define this move as a performative one because we experiment with different genres and voices to question and reproblematize existing understandings of knowledge frames. The genres we embody include performative writing, dialogue, autoethnography, essay form, personal narrative, and so on. Our goal is to address theories, stories, and pedagogies that speak to our tribulations in negotiating such intellectual displacements. This book can be an ideal supplementary text for courses in cultural studies as every chapter speaks in performative, reflexive, and storied ways to our own struggles to find real and theoretical homes. It will therefore have relevance to many departments in the humanities, including Communication Studies, English, Cultural Studies, Education, Anthropology, Sociology, and Women's Studies. In fact, this book serves the heuristic function of inspiring new research questions and demonstrating how a wide range of theories and research methods can be employed to enact discourses of home and exile.
Performance Theories in Education: Power, Pedagogy, and the Politics of Identity breaks new ground by presenting a range of approaches to understanding the role, function, impact, and presence of performance in education. It is a definitive contribution to a beginning dialogue on how performance, as a theoretical and pragmatic lens, can be used to view the processes, procedures, and politics of education. The conceptual framework of the volume is the editors' argument that performance and performativity help to locate and describe repetitive actions plotted within grids of power relationships and social norms that comprise the context of education and schooling.

The book brings together performance studies and education researchers, teachers, and scholars to investigate such topics as:
*the relationship between performance and performativity in pedagogical practice; *the nature and impact of performing identities in varying contexts;
*cultural and community configurations that fall under the umbrella of teaching, education, and schooling; and
*the hot button issues of educational policies and reform as performances.

With the aim of developing a clearer understanding of the effect, affect, and role of performance in education, the volume provides a crucial starting point for discourse among theorists and teacher practitioners who are interested in understanding and acknowledging the politics of performance and the practices of performative social identities that always and already intervene in the educational endeavor.
After 9/11, rightists capitalized on an atmosphere of fear and confusion to resuscitate the “culture wars” of the 1990s and once again targeted the academy. Using tactics reminiscent of the McCarthy era, religious firebrands, militant neoconservatives, and free market fundamentalists engaged in a concerted effort to silence voices critical of the ‘war on terror’ and liken legitimate dissent to treason. Brandishing a discourse of “patriotic correctness” (PC) that was informed by American ‘exceptionalism,’ Christian nationalism, anti-intellectualism, and virulent anti-liberalism, this coalition portrayed the professoriate as a dangerous cabal seeking the demise of ‘Western civilization.’ In Cold Breezes and Idiot Winds, Scatamburlo-D’Annibale explains why the most recent assault on academe must be understood in relation to the right’s broader offensive against liberalism. For decades, conservatives have worked diligently to construct a network of foundations, think tanks, and campus organizations dedicated to demonizing progressive thought, the legacy of the New Deal era, and the democratic social reforms of the 1960s. The author provides a detailed examination of this ideological infrastructure and how it advanced the agenda of PC post-9/11. She explores how the campaign for PC was aided and abetted by a right-wing media apparatus, how it continues to threaten academic freedom on campuses, and how it is currently infecting the larger body politic and contributing to the increased toxicity of the nation’s public dialogue. While purveyors of PC often invoke “culture war” rhetoric, Scatamburlo-D’Annibale adroitly reveals that their ultimate aim is to protect corporate power from any form of democratic accountability.
Tolu Olorunda is a cultural critic whose work has regularly appeared on AlterNet, Black Commentator, CounterPunch, Truthout, and several other publications including ColorLines magazine, The Nation magazine, and Wiretap magazine. His book, The Substance of Truth, takes a frank look into what has become of a society that touts grand and lofty ideals which it often fails to fulfill. With essays addressing issues as broad as the education system, 21st century media culture, Hip-Hop culture, youth culture, neoliberalism, and moral poverty, Olorunda argues the days ahead would darken in promise if rigorous action isn’t soon applied to rectify the way people think, how they respond to their surroundings, and the decisions they take to make the world better than it stands today. This struggle, he insists, could define whether or not a livable future would exist for the most vulnerable of all—children, whose plights are increasingly cast aside and ignored. From the book: “At risk of appearing alarmist, it’s easy to ignore all the warning signs hanging around us that suggest the clock is ticking fast—real fast!—and that time left for due action is short. But if life for the next generation should contain some semblance of sanity—where life itself means more than shopping malls and commodities, where Power stands accountable to the demands of communities—all fear of coming across hyperbolic would have to give way to the realities staring us down. The risk also extends to coming across Pollyannaish, as though all the impurities and iniquities holding hostage society can be cured with essays or lectures. But we cannot afford to let this moment slip by unattended, unengaged. The problems number endless—and so do the possibilities. And at no other moment has a generation been more fortunate, with the ease of technology, to make miracles happen amidst frightening circumstances. At no other moment has the clarion call blared this clearly and loudly.”
Home and exile have become key discussions in discourses of globalization, cosmopolitanism, postcolonialism, transnationalism, identity, and multiculturalism. These discourses can be expected to flourish in the future as an increasing number of multicultural scholars struggle with various kinds of displacements and the meaning of home that is thereby instantiated anew as we experience living in between cultures. This book sits in the intersection between cultural studies and performance studies. It seeks to break theoretical and empirical ground by reframing understandings of home and exile. Popular notions of exile forwarded by transnational and postcolonial scholars position home as a place of return and longing. While we believe that there are many truths in this position, we performatively seek emergent forms of displacement that are demanding new frameworks with which to enact meanings of home and exile. As Third World immigrant scholars in Western academe, we believe our move is vital in order to explore the experiences of persons, such as ourselves, who fall outside the models of displacement that have long constituted émigré writings. We define this move as a performative one because we experiment with different genres and voices to question and reproblematize existing understandings of knowledge frames. The genres we embody include performative writing, dialogue, autoethnography, essay form, personal narrative, and so on. Our goal is to address theories, stories, and pedagogies that speak to our tribulations in negotiating such intellectual displacements. This book can be an ideal supplementary text for courses in cultural studies as every chapter speaks in performative, reflexive, and storied ways to our own struggles to find real and theoretical homes. It will therefore have relevance to many departments in the humanities, including Communication Studies, English, Cultural Studies, Education, Anthropology, Sociology, and Women's Studies. In fact, this book serves the heuristic function of inspiring new research questions and demonstrating how a wide range of theories and research methods can be employed to enact discourses of home and exile.
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