Napoleon's Infantry Handbook

Pen and Sword
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If not a field marshal's baton, what did Napoleon's soldiers really carry in their backpacks? ??Napoleon's Infantry Handbook is an essential reference guide, filled with fascinating detail on the training, tactics, equipment, service and administration of Napoleon's infantry regiments. Based on contemporary training manuals, regulations and orders, Napoleon's Infantry Handbook details the everyday routines and practises which governed the imperial army up to the Battle of Waterloo and made it one of history's most formidable military machines. ??Through years of research, Terry Crowdy has amassed a huge wealth of information on every aspect of the infantryman's existence, from weapons drill and maintenance, uniform regulations, pay, diet, cooking regulations, hygiene and latrine digging, medical care, burial of the dead, how to apply for leave and so on. This remarkable book fills in the gaps left by campaign histories and even eyewitness memoirs, which often omit such details. This book doesn't merely recount what Napoleon's armies did, it explains how they did it. The result is a unique guide to the everyday life of Napoleon's infantry soldiers.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Pen and Sword
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Published on
Jan 30, 2015
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9781473852327
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / France
History / Modern / 19th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Telling their stories with power and intimacy, McCullough brings us into the lives of remarkable men and women who, in Saint-Gaudens’ phrase, longed “to soar into the blue.
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