The Declaration of Independence and The Constitution of the United States

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Together in one book, the two most important documents in United States history form the enduring legacy of America’s Founding Fathers including Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton.

The Declaration of Independence was the promise of a representative government; the Constitution was the fulfillment of that promise.

On July 4, 1776, the Second Continental Congress issued a unanimous declaration: the thirteen North American colonies would be the thirteen United States of America, free and independent of Great Britain. Drafted by Thomas Jefferson, the Declaration set forth the terms of a new form of government with the following words: "We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness."

Framed in 1787 and in effect since March 1789, the Constitution of the United States of America fulfilled the promise of the Declaration by establishing a republican form of government with separate executive, legislative, and judicial branches. The first ten amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, became part of the Constitution on December 15, 1791. Among the rights guaranteed by these amendments are freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, and the right to trial by jury. Written so that it could be adapted to endure for years to come, the Constitution has been amended only seventeen times since 1791 and has lasted longer than any other written form of government.
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About the author

Pauline Maier was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. She received her BA from Radcliffe College in 1960, was a Fulbright Scholar at the London School of Economics in 1960-61, and took her PhD at Harvard University in 1968. She taught at Harvard, the University of Massachusetts (Boston), University of Wisconsin, Yale University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where was a William R. Kenan Jr Professor of American History. She was the author of From Resistance to Revolution, The Old Revolutionaries, and The American People: A History (a single-authored text for junior high school), as well as numerous other articles and reviews. She died in 2013.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bantam Classics
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Published on
Apr 29, 2008
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Pages
112
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ISBN
9780553904970
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / General
History / United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
Political Science / Constitutions
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Have you ever wanted to read the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence and really understand what they’re saying?

 

Learn how they impact your life; your rights and freedoms? How the branches of government were formed, and why?

 

You’re not alone. Millions of Americans want a deeper understanding of their country’s founding principles and don’t know where to start. When the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence were written by our founders over two centuries ago, they were designed to endure. And indeed they’ve remained, as Paul Skousen writes, “the most amazing freedom formula ever invented”—but navigating eighteenth-century legal language can be challenging.

 

Recognizing this problem, Skousen provides an easy, step-by-step guide that will forever change the way you think about your country and your freedoms. Using visual tools, exercises, and several valuable memory aids, this book will help you:

 

·      Master the Constitution’s seven articles and the twenty-seven important rights named in the Bill of Rights.

·      Navigate the Declaration’s five power statements on freedom and unlock their eighteenth-century phrases with a convenient glossary.

·      Discover how the Constitution’s guiding principles protect human rights.

·      And so much more.

 

Thousands of books describe the origins of these famous documents, but only How to Read the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence gives you a path to truly understanding them.

 

 

Praise for How to Read the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence:

 

“It’s great! I highly recommend How to Read the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence!”—Sam Sorbo, actress; host of The Sam Sorbo Show
 
“How to Read the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence is the best book of the 2016 election season, but it has nothing to do with candidates or political parties. It is a handbook every voter should have to understand why the polling booth transcends politics. This is an easy-to-read guide to discover why we call ourselves constitutionalists and not just conservatives. Just from reading it for the first time (it’s a book worth perusing regularly), I have a better understanding of the logical reasoning behind the writings of the Founding Fathers and a deeper appreciation for their gifted vision of a United States of America. How to Read the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence is powerful ammunition for patriots on the front lines in the fight for liberty.”—Peter Gemma, conservative writer; veteran political activist
 
“As an educator, I am concerned that the next generation be able to understand the wisdom in our country’s brilliant founding documents. After reading Mr. Skousen’s new book, How to Read the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, I believe a very useful, simple, and innovative way to understand that system is here. Now, anyone can take those documents and, following the outline in this text, unravel the plain meaning. How they came about; how they are laid out; unfamiliar terms are clearly explained; short historical context; tests to check for understanding—it’s all there. I recommend this small volume for individuals and for school districts. With its simple layout, a teacher could easily use it as part of a unit on our nation’s founding.”—Ivan Brown, Chairman of the Constitution Party of Arizona
 
“How to Read the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence by Paul B. Skousen makes our nation’s founding documents easier to read and remember. This book can arm the reader with understanding and patriotic vigilance to protect our nation and allow it to continue to stand as a beacon to the world. I recommend this book to any and all who are patriotic and freedom loving. It is one tool that can help us defend our homes, our families, our beliefs, and our ability to live safely, securely, and happily.”—AML Review


How often have people claimed that a certain thing was "in the Constitution" and you've wanted to pull out a copy to show them what this incredible document really says?

This is the book you want to keep with you at all times: the full text of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, the two documents that are the backbone of United States government. Reading them as they were written is a must for every American. Regular reading is required for any historian or member of the legal profession, and a good idea for all Americans.

Acclaimed Constitutional scholar Paul Skousen, author of How to Read the Constitution, frames this simple text with a brief preface and a summary of important facts about these two documents, including important dates, for the ultimate quick reference. Throughout the text of the Constitution, he provides a clear guide to parts that became invalid due to later amendments, making the current meaning clear. Without intruding on the meaning, Skousen gives you a great tool for understanding our most basic principles of good government. An inspiring introduction by New York Times best-selling author Dan Clark will put you in the right frame of mind to read and appreciate these great documents.

This handy guide can become your best friend, and you'll want to keep a copy nearby. Fortunately, this little book will easily fit into your pocket or briefcase, top desk drawer, or iPad case. You'll may find you want to have extra copies around to hand out, too. Here is your chance to become an expert on two of the most important documents that shaped our country!
Presented here for the first time in one volume are the three founding documents of the United States and another that altered and divided the Union for a brief moment in history. Declaration of Independence: Adopted by the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, this may be the most famous angry letter in history. Written by Thomas Jefferson and addressed to King George III of England, it lays out the grievances of the king's 13 colonies in North America, and announces that those colonies were now free of English rule. By 1783, after a long, bloody, and expensive war, that freedom became a reality. Articles of Confederation: Soon after independence from England was declared, the Second Continental Congress instituted this first organizing document of the new United States, which was ratified in March 1781. A compromise between those delegates who wanted a strong central government and those who demanded that the states be sovereign, its shortcomings became obvious during the war--such as the fact that the central government had no power to collect taxes or even to enforce requests for funds from the states, which led to a perpetually underfunded revolution against England. United States Constitution: This document replaced the Articles of Confederation on June 21, 1788. One of the most influential works of political philosophy and practicality ever written, it is the oldest national constitution still in use today, and continues to inspire freedom-loving peoples around the world. Its three-pronged system of government--balancing power among legislative, judicial, and executive branches--was groundbreaking. But it failed to address one issue, slavery, that would come to a head a century later. Constitution of the Confederate States: This 1861 document organized the new nation created by the seceding slave states. While quite similar in many ways to the U.S. Constitution, it includes more references to God and religion and more emphasis on state sovereignty, offers specific clauses that seek to limit the influence of big business on politics, and codifies the right to own "negro slaves." Together, these four documents offer a firsthand perspective on the political history of the United States.
Have you ever had trouble understanding the United States Bill of Rights?

Have you ever wondered what was really meant by one or more of the ten amendments?

Have you ever been unsure as to how these rights apply to modern society?

Have you even questioned if the Bill of Rights should still be held as inviolable law, nearly 250 years after its writing?

Here's the truth: the Bill of Rights is not easy to understand if you just pick it up and give it a read. The eloquent style in which it's written can be confusing. The language can cause misunderstandings. There's a lot of legal terminology that's beyond most of us. Without an understanding of the historical background of certain amendments, it's impossible to fully understand their importance and scope. And to top it all off, there are countless politicians and pundits that try to interpret our rights for us and tell us what the Founders meant.

But are you comfortable letting crooked politicians decide what your rights are? Or would you rather know and be able to insist on, with certainty, the freedoms our Founders intended for you, your family, your friends, and your fellow Americans? If you're like millions of other Americans, you'll choose the latter.

Thomas Jefferson said, "Educate and inform the whole mass of the people...They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty." He also said, "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free... it expects what never was and never will be."

That's why this book was created, and it would make the Founders proud if they were here today. This book helps you easily reach a deep understanding of the Bill of Rights by walking you through each amendment, clarifying the precise definitions of key words; providing the historical context you need to fully grasp and spirit and importance of the amendments; sharing powerfully insightful quotes on each amendment, straight from the Founders and their peers; supplying you with an extensive glossary of terms so you never get lost in a dictionary or encyclopedia trying to understand what you're reading; and more.

The Founders fought tirelessly to guarantee you specific rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Don't let two-faced politicians and pundits tell you what your rights are.

Scroll up and click the "Buy" button now to learn your rights, and together, we can keep the spirit of freedom alive in this great nation.

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