Critical Thinking and Logic: A Philosophical Workbook

Gegensatz Press
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An inexpensive but comprehensive introduction. Examples and homework problems touch on philosophical issues much more so than standard texts, providing instructors an opportunity to ease into philosophical discussions as desired and piquing student interest. Homework assignments are on tear-out pages for ease of use.

While Critical Thinking and Logic: A Philosophical Workbook covers standard issues of critical thinking such as argument types and fallacies, it also provides a solid foundation for an advanced course in formal logic. The final chapter includes a complete translation of Descartes’s Meditations, allowing students to put their newly acquired skills to work on a classic work of philosophy.

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About the author

Todd M. Furman teaches at McNeese State University, Lake
Charles, Louisiana. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from
the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1992, writing
his dissertation on the Gettier problem. His primary interests in
philosophy include Hume, skepticism, and the philosophy of
religion – especially the problem of evil.
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Additional Information

Gegensatz Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Best For
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Philosophy / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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