Between Colonialism and Diaspora: Sikh Cultural Formations in an Imperial World

Duke University Press
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Bringing South Asian and British imperial history together with recent scholarship on transnationalism and postcolonialism, Tony Ballantyne offers a bold reevaluation of constructions of Sikh identity from the late eighteenth century through the early twenty-first. Ballantyne considers Sikh communities and experiences in Punjab, the rest of South Asia, the United Kingdom, and other parts of the world. He charts the shifting, complex, and frequently competing visions of Sikh identity that have been produced in response to the momentous social changes wrought by colonialism and diaspora. In the process, he argues that Sikh studies must expand its scope to take into account not only how Sikhism is figured in religious and political texts but also on the battlefields of Asia and Europe, in the streets of Singapore and Southall, and in the nightclubs of New Delhi and Newcastle.

Constructing an expansive historical archive, Ballantyne draws on film, sculpture, fiction, and Web sites, as well as private papers, government records, journalism, and travel narratives. He proceeds from a critique of recent historiography on the development of Sikhism to an analysis of how Sikh identity changed over the course of the long nineteenth century. Ballantyne goes on to offer a reading of the contested interpretations of the life of Dalip Singh, the last Maharaja of Punjab. He concludes with an exploration of bhangra, a traditional form of Punjabi dance that diasporic artists have transformed into a globally popular music style. Much of bhangra’s recent evolution stems from encounters of the Sikh and Afro-Caribbean communities, particularly in the United Kingdom. Ballantyne contends that such cross-cultural encounters are central in defining Sikh identity both in Punjab and the diaspora.

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About the author

Tony Ballantyne is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Otago in New Zealand. He is the author of Orientalism and Race: Aryanism in the British Empire and a coeditor of Bodies in Contact: Rethinking Colonial Encounters in World History, also published by Duke University Press.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Aug 16, 2006
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Pages
248
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ISBN
9780822388111
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / India & South Asia
Religion / Sikhism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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This prayer book is the kind manifestation of Waheguru ji’s  grace. It is aimed to assist all, especially the young and those who do not understand Gurmukhi yet, to do Nitnem.

Prayer is an essential part of Sikhism. As food nourishes and strengthens the body, prayer purifies the mind uplifts the soul.

Sikhs are ordained to rise in the morning and meditate on the Name of God ‘Waheguru’.

They are also expected to do ‘Nitnem’ which literally means ‘Daily Routine’.

Nitnem is composed of a collection of five prayers to be done during different periods of the day.

Morning  (3 prayers) Japji Sahib, Jaap Sahib and Sawaiye.

Evening (1 prayer) – Rehras Sahib

Night (1 prayer) – Kirtan Sohila

Ardaas should be done after every prayer session.

I have included Ardaas for the reader in this book too.

The person who forms the habit of doing Nitnem daily, ultimately experiences bliss and peace.

While the best experience would be derived from reading the prayers in Gurmukhi, there should be no hindrance for anyone who does not know the Gurmukhi script, to do Nitnem

While every effort has been made to simplify the transliteration, I encourage the reader to read the prayers while listening to them in audio format a couple of times.

This will help them grasp the correct pronunciation.

There is a section for links to the individual prayers in YouTube. This will help to get the correct pronunciation, or if you wish to just listen to the prayers.

This prayer book is perfect to carry around in one’s device, so the prayers can be performed from anywhere.

It is also a wonderful gift to offer to friends and family.

After doing prayers regularly, one can look for translation books to assist in helping understand the Bani.

I am certain that by Waheguru ji’s grace, the reader will eventually seek to learn the Gurmukhi script.


The Dasam Granth is a 1,428-page anthology of diverse compositions attributed to the tenth Guru of Sikhism, Guru Gobind Singh, and a topic of great controversy among Sikhs. The controversy stems from two major issues: a substantial portion of the Dasam Granth relates tales from Hindu mythology, suggesting a disconnect from normative Sikh theology; and a long composition entitled Charitropakhian tells several hundred rather graphic stories about illicit liaisons between men and women. Sikhs have debated whether the text deserves status as a "scripture" or should be read instead as "literature." Sikh scholars have also long debated whether Guru Gobind Singh in fact authored the entire Dasam Granth. Much of the secondary literature on the Dasam Granth focuses on this authorship issue, and despite an ever-growing body of articles, essays, and books (mainly in Punjabi), the debate has not moved forward. The available manuscript and other historical evidence do not provide conclusive answers regarding authorship. The debate has been so acrimonious at times that in 2000, Sikh leader Joginder Singh Vedanti issued a directive that Sikh scholars not comment on the Dasam Granth publicly at all pending a committee inquiry into the matter. Debating the Dasam Granth is the first English language, book-length critical study of this controversial Sikh text in many years. Based on research on the original text in the Brajbhasha and Punjabi languages, a critical reading of the secondary literature in Punjabi, Hindi, and English, and interviews with scholars and Sikh leaders in India, it offers a thorough introduction to the Dasam Granth, its history, debates about its authenticity, and an in-depth analysis of its most important compositions.
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