From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America, Edition 10

Oxford University Press
2
Free sample

From Out of the Shadows was the first full study of Mexican-American women in the twentieth century. Beginning with the first wave of Mexican women crossing the border early in the century, historian Vicki L. Ruiz reveals the struggles they have faced and the communities they have built. In a narrative enhanced by interviews and personal stories, she shows how from labor camps, boxcar settlements, and urban barrios, Mexican women nurtured families, worked for wages, built extended networks, and participated in community associations--efforts that helped Mexican Americans find their own place in America. She also narrates the tensions that arose between generations, as the parents tried to rein in young daughters eager to adopt American ways. Finally, the book highlights the various forms of political protest initiated by Mexican-American women, including civil rights activity and protests against the war in Vietnam. For this new edition of From Out of the Shadows, Ruiz has written an afterword that continues the story of the Mexicana experience in the United States, as well as outlines new additions to the growing field of Latina history.
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About the author

Vicki L. Ruiz is Professor of History and Chicano/Latino Studies and Dean of the School of Humanities at the University of California, Irvine.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
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Published on
Nov 5, 2008
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9780199705450
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Americas (North, Central, South, West Indies)
History / United States / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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