Living on the Grid: The Fundamentals of the North American Electric Grids in Simple Language

iUniverse
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Theres probably a good chance that youve turned on your television, computer, or an appliance without giving much thought about the electric grid. But when theres a power outage, its a different story. Suddenly, youre asking yourself questions such as: What is the electric grid and who owns it? Who controls the grid and how is it controlled? What causes a grid blackout? What is the future of the grid? William L. Thompson, who retired from Dominion Virginia Power after thirty-eight years in the electric business, answers those questions and many more in this book for anyone curious about the electric grid and how it works. In plain, simple language, he reveals what goes on behind the scenes at grid control centers across the country. He also explains how electricity is generated through renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. He also examines the causes behind the largest blackout in United States history and how global warming and technological developments could permanently change Living on the Grid.
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About the author

William L. Thompson earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Virginia Tech and a master’s in business administration from Averett University. He retired from Dominion Virginia Power after thirty-eight years in the electric business. He has two grown sons and lives with his wife in Richmond, Virginia.

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Additional Information

Publisher
iUniverse
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Published on
May 21, 2016
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Pages
218
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ISBN
9781491790441
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Language
English
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Genres
Technology & Engineering / Electrical
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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