The Death of a President: November 20-November 25, 1963

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William Manchester's "authoritative and powerful" account (Time) of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.


As the world still reeled from the tragic and historic events of November 22, 1963, William Manchester set out, at the request of the Kennedy family, to create a detailed, authoritative record of the days immediately preceding and following President John F. Kennedy's death.

Through hundreds of interviews, abundant travel and firsthand observation, and with unique access to the proceedings of the Warren Commission, Manchester conducted an exhaustive historical investigation, accumulating forty-five volumes of documents, exhibits, and transcribed tapes. His ultimate objective -- to set down as a whole the national and personal tragedy that was JFK's assassination -- is brilliantly achieved in this galvanizing narrative, a book universally acclaimed as a landmark work of modern history.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Little, Brown
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Published on
Oct 8, 2013
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Pages
736
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ISBN
9780316370721
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Presidents & Heads of State
History / United States / 20th Century
Political Science / American Government / Executive Branch
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Praise for Being Nixon

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