A Frozen Hell: The Russo-Finnish Winter War of 1939–1940

Algonquin Books
4
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The true story of the battle between Finland and Russia that erupted at the dawn of World War II.
 
On a November morning in 1939, Soviet bombers began attacking Helsinki, Finland. In the weeks that followed, the tiny Baltic republic would wage a war—the kind of war that spawns legends—against the mighty Soviet Union, which was desperate for a buffer against Nazi Germany.
 
With “a well-balanced blend of narrative and analysis,” historian William R. Trotter tells the story of guerrillas on skis; heroic, single-handed attacks on tanks; unfathomable endurance; and the charismatic leadership of one of the twentieth century’s true military geniuses (Library Journal). This little-known but dramatic battle would be decisive in Finland’s fight to maintain its independence—and A Frozen Hell brings it to fascinating life.
 
Winner of the Finlandia Foundation Award for Arts and Letters
 
“We will not often find a book written with such authority as this one.” —The New York Times Book Review
 
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About the author

William R. Trotter was raised in Charlotte, North Carolina, and educated at Davidson College, where he earned a B.A. in European History. He has worked as a regional music critic, a book reviewer, and a freelance historian and feature writer. Trotter has published twelve books as well as many articles--in The Independent (North Carolina), Spectator Magazine, the American Record Magazine, Film Culture, Military History Monthly, and dozens of other magazines. Since 1987, he has been a senior writer for PC Gamer Magazine. In 1995, Trotter won the Finlandia Foundation's Arts and Letters Prize for A Frozen Hell, and the book is required reading for the 2nd Marine Division. In addition, his biography of Mitropoulos, Priest of Music: The Life and Times of Dimitri Mitropoulos, was selected as one of the "ten best 'arts' books of the year" by National Public Radio, and one of his novellas has been nominated for a Bram Stoker Award. William Trotter lives with his wife and their youngest son in Greensboro, North Carolina.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Algonquin Books
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Published on
Jun 13, 2013
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Pages
285
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ISBN
9781565126923
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Scandinavia
History / Military / World War II
History / Russia & the Former Soviet Union
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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A gripping and authoritative revisionist account of the German Winter Campaign of 1941–1942

Germany’s winter campaign of 1941–1942 is commonly seen as its first defeat. In Retreat from Moscow, a bold, gripping account of one of the seminal moments of World War II, David Stahel argues that instead it was its first strategic success in the East. The Soviet counteroffensive was in fact a Pyrrhic victory. Despite being pushed back from Moscow, the Wehrmacht lost far fewer men, frustrated its enemy’s strategy, and emerged in the spring unbroken and poised to recapture the initiative.

Hitler’s strategic plan called for holding important Russian industrial cities, and the German army succeeded. The Soviets as of January 1942 aimed for nothing less than the destruction of Army Group Center, yet not a single German unit was ever destroyed. Lacking the professionalism, training, and experience of the Wehrmacht, the Red Army’s offensive attempting to break German lines in countless head-on assaults led to far more tactical defeats than victories.

Using accounts from journals, memoirs, and wartime correspondence, Stahel takes us directly into the Wolf’s Lair to reveal a German command at war with itself as generals on the ground fought to maintain order and save their troops in the face of Hitler’s capricious, increasingly irrational directives. Excerpts from soldiers’ diaries and letters home paint a rich portrait of life and death on the front, where the men of the Ostheer battled frostbite nearly as deadly as Soviet artillery. With this latest installment of his pathbreaking series on the Eastern Front, David Stahel completes a military history of the highest order

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