Concurring Opinion Writing on the U.S. Supreme Court

SUNY Press
Free sample

When justices write or join a concurring opinion, they demonstrate their preferences over substantive legal rules. Concurrences provide a way for justices to express their views about the law, to engage in a dialogue of law with each other, the legal community, the public, and Congress. This important study is the first systematic examination of the content of Supreme Court concurrences. While previous work on Supreme Court decision making focuses solely on the outcome of cases, Pamela C. Corley tackles the content of Supreme Court concurring opinions to show the reasoning behind each justice’s decision. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis, Concurring Opinion Writing on the U.S. Supreme Court offers a rich and detailed portrait of judicial decision making by studying the process of opinion writing and the formation of legal doctrine through the unique lens of concurrences.

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About the author

Pamela C. Corley is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Mar 24, 2010
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Pages
158
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ISBN
9781438430683
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Judicial Power
Political Science / American Government / Judicial Branch
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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