Florence in the Forgotten Centuries, 1527-1800: A History of Florence and the Florentines in the Age of the Grand Dukes

University of Chicago Press
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The city of Florence has long been admired as the home of the brilliant artistic and literary achievement of the early Renaissance. But most histories of Florence go no further than the first decades of the sixteenth century. They thus give the impression that Florentine culture suddenly died with the generation of Leonardo, Machiavelli, and Andrea del Sarto.

Eric Cochrane shows that the Florentines maintained their creativity long after they had lost their position as the cultural leaders of Europe. When their political philosophy and historiography ran dry, they turned to the practical problems of civil administration. When their artists finally yielded to outside influence, they turned to music and the natural sciences. Even during the darkest days of the great economic depression of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, they succeeded in preserving—almost alone in Europe—the blessings of external peace and domestic tranquility.
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About the author

Eric Cochrane (1928–85) was professor of history at the University of Chicago. Among his many publications are Tradition and Enlightenment in the Tuscan Academies and Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance, both also published by the University of Chicago Press.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Oct 30, 2013
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Pages
608
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ISBN
9780226115955
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Italy
History / General
History / Modern / 16th Century
History / Modern / 17th Century
History / Modern / 18th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The epic story of the fall of the Inca Empire to Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro in the aftermath of a bloody civil war, and the recent discovery of the lost guerrilla capital of the Incas, Vilcabamba, by three American explorers.

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