Urban Social Movements in Jerusalem: The Protest of the Second Generation

SUNY Press
Free sample

Hasson explores the development of eight urban protest organizations in Israel, revealing how social deprivation is transformed into organized patterns of activity. To investigate how and why urban movements evolve, he depicts the housing and social conditions in which members of Jerusalem’s second generation found themselves. He follows their trajectories: analyzes the process of organization building and the formation of urban social movements; the conflict between charismatic, protest powers and the state; the routinization of charisma. He also traces the critical response of the state to these processes.
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About the author

Shlomo Hasson is Associate Professor at Hebrew University and Senior Researcher at the Jerusalem Institute for Israeli Studies.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Feb 1, 2012
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Pages
198
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ISBN
9781438406060
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Middle East / Israel & Palestine
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Includes 204 photos, plans and maps illustrating The Holocaust

This is the story of No. 22483, who had been shipped from Belgium to Buchenwald. This is an account of what No. 22483 saw and felt during his calvary from Antwerp to the Malin distribution camp in France and from there to the extermination camp of Buchenwald.

To say that this book contains the scenes of a twentieth-century Inferno may sound commonplace. Yet, every page of this book reminds one of Dante’s Inferno, with one exception: the Inferno the author writes about consumed the lives not of the sinful whom divine justice cast into the immortality of suffering.
This Inferno was thronged by millions, many of whom were babies and little children, mothers and young women who had hoped to become mothers. It was thronged with people who deserved their fates because they were men in the sense that God meant them to be. They were in Inferno because they were strong men and brave, the real heroes of our days. They were doomed because the Nazi super-race set up a different scale of values which regarded heroism as the greatest of sins and considered depravity the greatest of virtues. Reading this book one feels that the titanic Dante himself would have been staggered by the demented criminality the judges of the just displayed.

This is the story of No. 22483 of Buchenwald, one of the millions who were doomed and one of the few who escaped. Throughout, the writing is poignant, vibrant with humanity, a cry “de profundis” and a vow that it must never happen again. This book should be long remembered.
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