A Night to Remember: The Sinking of the Titanic

Open Road Media
88
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#1 New York Times Bestseller: The definitive account of the sinking of the Titanic, based on interviews with survivors.
 At first, no one but the lookout recognized the sound. Passengers described it as the impact of a heavy wave, a scraping noise, or the tearing of a long calico strip. In fact, it was the sound of the world’s most famous ocean liner striking an iceberg, and it served as the death knell for 1,500 souls. In the next two hours and forty minutes, the maiden voyage of the Titanic became one of history’s worst maritime accidents. As the ship’s deck slipped closer to the icy waterline, women pleaded with their husbands to join them on lifeboats. Men changed into their evening clothes to meet death with dignity. And in steerage, hundreds fought bitterly against certain death. At 2:15 a.m. the ship’s band played “Autumn.” Five minutes later, the Titanic was gone. Based on interviews with sixty-three survivors, Lord’s moment-by-moment account is among the finest books written about one of the twentieth century’s bleakest nights.
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About the author

Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was The Fremantle Diary (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, A Night to Remember (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the Titanic and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in Day of Infamy (1957), the battle of Midway in Incredible Victory (1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in The Past That Would Not Die (1965). In all, he published a dozen books.
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Reviews

4.4
88 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Mar 6, 2012
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Pages
244
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ISBN
9781453238417
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Modern / 20th Century
Technology & Engineering / Marine & Naval
Transportation / Ships & Shipbuilding / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Violet Jessop
Violet Jessop's life is an inspiring story of survival. Born in 1887 in Argentina, the eldest child of Irish immigrants, at the age of 21 she became the breadwinner for her widowed mother and five siblings when she commenced a career as a stewardess and nurse on some of the most famous ocean going vessels of the day. Throughout her 40 year time at sea she survived an unbelievable series of events including the sinking of the TITANIC.

“One awful moment of empty, misty blackness enveloped us in its loneliness, then an unforgettable, agonizing cry went up from 1500 despairing throats, a long wail and then silence and our tiny craft tossing about at the mercy of the ice field.”
For most people one sinking would be enough. But four years later Violet, now a nurse with the British Red Cross, was on board the World War I hospital ship BRITANNIC when it struck a mine and sank to the bottom of the Aegean. To her, this disaster was even more horrifying-- “Just as life seeming nothing but a whirling, choking ache, I rose to the light of day, my nose barely above the little lapping waves. I opened my eyes on an indescribable scene of slaughter, which made me shut them again to keep it out."

By the end of her story we have a met a woman who could handle whatever life threw at her with determination and good humor. She knew that only by her own strength of character would she survive. But Titanic Survivor is much more. A unique autobiography for those who want to know how it really felt, a story that could be told only by a Titanic Survivor.
Walter Lord
Includes more than 25 illustrations
WALTER LORD NEVER STARTS FROM SCRATCH. For months before a word of this book was written, he could be found roaming the country, ferreting out the fascinating people who helped shape these years. One week it might be Elijah Baum, who piloted Wilbur Wright to his first lodgings at Kitty Hawk...the next, and old fireman who fought the flames at San Francisco...the next, some militant suffragette.

Even in his raids on old diaries, letters, memoirs and newspapers, Mr. Lord usually headed straight for the scene. He was as likely to be found in an attic with a flashlight as at a desk with a pencil. That’s why the book is full of such fresh discoveries: secret Pinkerton reports on a famous murder, unpublished notes left by McKinley’s physician, the caterer’s instructions for Mrs. Astor’s ball, and many other factors unknown to the participants themselves.

It’s his loving attention to first-hand sources that makes Mr. Lord’s books so vivid for the thousands who read them.

Editorial Reviews:
“Informative and entertaining...although The Good Years is naturally and properly selective, it still achieves something of a panoramic effect.” —The New York Times

“[Lord uses] a kind of literary pointillism, the arrangement of contrasting bits of fact and emotion in such a fashion that a vividly real impression of an event is conveyed to the reader.” —New York Herald Tribune

“[Lord had] the extraordinary ability to bring the past to life.” —Jenny Lawrence, author of The Way It Was: Walter Lord on His Life and Books
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