The Big Thaw: Policy, Governance, and Climate Change in the Circumpolar North

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Explores the unprecedented and rapid climate changes occurring in the Arctic environment.


Climate change, one of the drivers of global change, is controversial in political circles, but recognized in scientific ones as being of central importance today for the United States and the world. In The Big Thaw, the editors bring together experts, advocates, and academic professionals who address the serious issue of how climate change in the Circumpolar Arctic is affecting and will continue to affect environments, cultures, societies, and economies throughout the world. The contributors discuss a variety of topics, including anthropology, sociology, human geography, community economics, regional development and planning, and political science, as well as biogeophysical sciences such as ecology, human-environmental interactions, and climatology.


“This book offers a valuable compendium on a broad spectrum of issues associated with climate change, its implications, and human adaptation in the Arctic.” — Andrey N. Petrov, coauthor of Arctic Sustainability Research: Past, Present, and Future

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About the author

At the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Ezra B. W. Zubrow is Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology.

At the University of Buffalo’s School of Law, Errol Meidinger is Distinguished Professor and Margaret W. Wong Professor of Law.  

Kim Diana Connolly is Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Advocacy and Experiential Education.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Sep 1, 2019
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Pages
472
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ISBN
9781438475653
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Environmental Conservation & Protection
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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What effect are you having on the environment? If you buy Kenyan green beans what is the CO2 cost? What about your journey to work, your fridge or your clothes? The Gem Carbon Counter is your portable instant green reckoner.

This handy little book includes:

• Introduction by Mark Lynas author of Hide Tide: News from a Warming World

• Welcome to the Greenhouse: Explains what the Greenhouse effect actually is, all the issues surrounding global warming and your carbon footprint?

• Your Carbon Footprint: Measure your own carbon footprint covering all aspects of your life from your food shopping to your work, holidays and clothes. Starting with your home gas and electricity supplies and usage, the handy green reckoner takes you through each part of your life and helps you add up the impact you are making on the environment. So, in turn, it allows you to identify the key parts of your life which you’ll need to adapt to reduce your carbon footprint: from which coffee you drink to how often you go on holiday.

• Sustainability: How do you measure up in comparison to the average person’s carbon footprint? What can you do to generate your own energy and therefore reduce your footprint and what sort of targets can you set yourself?

• Helpful Appendices: Includes information on carbon emissions for journeys by car, train and plane. A list of corporate companies, their emissions and what they are doing to reduce their carbon footprint so that as a consumer, you can make decisions on who you support. A helpful carbon diary where you can record your carbon footprint for the year. Useful websites where you can read more about green issues.

Global warming is a major phenomenon that is negatively affecting Earth. But what most people dont realize is that this effect is not limited within the planets atmosphere; it may also affect Earths journey through space. In Global Warming and Earths Evolution, author Graham Winston reveals that the bigger picture is bigger than Global Warming and Global Warming is only the tip of the iceberg of Earths own challenges. The book describes the real truths of Global Warming is mainly caused by mans unnecessary destruction of natural resources earth depends on to be in a good condition to successfully complete its next evolution cycle. The book explains the importance of the cycles and what evolutionary changes occurred on earth. Many previous unexplained phenomena could be linked to earths evolutionary cycles. The extinction of the dinosaur, the birth of the Grand Canyon: why has no large object recently collided with the Moon when millions of craters exist on the Moon? Why has the impacts stopped and when will the impacts start happening again? These and other fascinating examples of unsolved phenomena will open the minds of many readers to this new dimension of thinking what happened on earth millions of years ago and whether earth will survive the next evolutionary cycle. Global Warming has caused a negative effect on earth natural defense mechanism earth depends on to survive the severe challenges when close to the core of the Milky Way Galaxy. About the Author Graham Winstons professional experience spans over 20 years and involves solving complex problems. To achieve success in these business fields Winston solved many complex problems. The common skill applied across these fields was the development of innovative thinking. This later led to apply these same problem-solving techniques on Global Warming and Earths evolution cycles to understand the relationship between Global Warming and Earths own evolutionary journey as Earth travels across the Universe.
A comprehensive investigation of household life during the Upper Paleolithic era.

What was home and family like in Paleolithic Europe? How did mobile hunter-gatherer families live, work, and play together in the fourteenth millennium BP? What were the functional and spatial constraints and markers of their domesticity—the processes that create and sustain a household?

Despite the long recognized absence of comprehensive archaeological data on such ancient homes and hearths, the archaeologists in this volume begin unraveling the domesticity of the Upper Paleolithic by drawing on both an immense trove of new material evidence and comparative site data, and a range of incisive and illuminating ethnographic analogies, theoretical models, and simulations. Five Late Magdalenian sites from the Paris Basin and one later Azilian site provide striking evidence of well-preserved camps of short duration, situated on valley bottoms and buried by gentle floods. Of particular interest and value is the site of Verberie, rich in lithic tools, faunal remains, hearths, and other indicators of spatial organization, which has been excavated continuously for twenty-six years by the same director and provides an unparalleled source of information on Paleolithic domesticity. The first group of essays and reports look at the technology and demographic evidences of domesticity; the second set seeks clues to the spatial patterning of Paleolithic households; while the final essays draw on ethnographic analogies to reconstruct and interpret gendered divisions of labor, perishable technologies, and other activities not directly recognizable from archaeological remains.

“[The Magdalenian Household] should be required reading for anyone with an interest in Upper Palaeolithic behaviour and the evolution of the use of space.” — Antiquity

“…because of the excellent syntheses of especially the long-term, high-quality research at Verberie, this book should be in the collections of all institutions with serious interests in Upper Paleolithic prehistory.” — Journal of Anthropological Research
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “The Uninhabitable Earth hits you like a comet, with an overflow of insanely lyrical prose about our pending Armageddon.”—Andrew Solomon, author of The Noonday Demon

It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible—food shortages, refugee emergencies, climate wars and economic devastation.

An “epoch-defining book” (The Guardian) and “this generation’s Silent Spring” (The Washington Post), The Uninhabitable Earth is both a travelogue of the near future and a meditation on how that future will look to those living through it—the ways that warming promises to transform global politics, the meaning of technology and nature in the modern world, the sustainability of capitalism and the trajectory of human progress.

The Uninhabitable Earth is also an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation—today’s.

Praise for The Uninhabitable Earth

“The Uninhabitable Earth is the most terrifying book I have ever read. Its subject is climate change, and its method is scientific, but its mode is Old Testament. The book is a meticulously documented, white-knuckled tour through the cascading catastrophes that will soon engulf our warming planet.”—Farhad Manjoo, The New York Times

“Riveting. . . . Some readers will find Mr. Wallace-Wells’s outline of possible futures alarmist. He is indeed alarmed. You should be, too.”—The Economist

“Potent and evocative. . . . Wallace-Wells has resolved to offer something other than the standard narrative of climate change. . . . He avoids the ‘eerily banal language of climatology’ in favor of lush, rolling prose.”—Jennifer Szalai, The New York Times

“The book has potential to be this generation’s Silent Spring.”—The Washington Post

“The Uninhabitable Earth, which has become a best seller, taps into the underlying emotion of the day: fear. . . . I encourage people to read this book.”—Alan Weisman, The New York Review of Books
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