Self-Consciousness and Objectivity

Harvard University Press
Free sample

Sebastian Rödl undermines a foundational dogma of contemporary philosophy: that knowledge, in order to be objective, must be knowledge of something that is as it is, independent of being known to be so. This profound work revives the thought that knowledge, precisely on account of being objective, is self-knowledge: knowledge knowing itself.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Harvard University Press
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Published on
Jan 8, 2018
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Pages
176
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ISBN
9780674983274
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Epistemology
Philosophy / Mind & Body
Philosophy / Movements / Idealism
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This content is DRM protected.
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Christopher Peacocke presents a philosophical theory of subjects of consciousness, together with a theory of the nature of first person representation of such a subject of consciousness. He develops a new treatment of subjects, distinct from previous theories, under which subjects were regarded either as constructs from mental events, or fundamentally embodied, or Cartesian egos. In contrast, his theory of the first person integrates with the positive treatment of subjects—and it contributes to the explanation of various distinctive first person phenomena in the theory of thought and knowledge. These are issues on which contributions have been made by some of the greatest philosophers, and Peacocke brings his points to bear on the contributions to these issues made by Hume, Kant, Frege, Wittgenstein, and Strawson. He also relates his position to the recent literature in the philosophy of mind, and then goes on to distinguish and characterize three varieties of self-consciousness. Perspectival self-consciousness involves the subject's capacity to appreciate that she is of the same kind as things given in a third personal way, and attributes the subject to a certain kind of objective thought about herself. Reflective self-consciousness involves awareness of the subject's own mental states, reached in a distinctive way. Interpersonal self-consciousness is awareness that one features, as a subject, in some other person's mental states. These varieties, and the relations and the forms of co-operation between them, are important in explaining features of our knowledge, our social relations, and our emotional lives. The theses of The Mirror of the World are of importance not only for philosophy, but also for psychology, the arts, and anywhere else that the self and self-representation loom large. The Context and Content series is a forum for outstanding original research at the intersection of philosophy, linguistics, and cognitive science. The general editor is François Recanati (Institut Jean-Nicod, Paris).
This carefully crafted ebook: "IMMANUEL KANT Premium Collection: Complete Critiques, Philosophical Works and Essays (Including Kant's Inaugural Dissertation)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Table of Contents: Introduction: IMMANUEL KANT by Robert Adamson KANT'S INAUGURAL DISSERTATION OF 1770 Three Critiques: THE CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON THE CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON THE CRITIQUE OF JUDGMENT Critical Works: PRELOGOMENA TO ANY FUTURE METAPHYSICS FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF THE METAPHYSIC OF MORALS THE METAPHYSICS OF MORALS Philosophy of Law; or, The Science of Right The Metaphysical Elements of Ethics Pre-Critical Works and Essays: DREAMS OF A SPIRIT-SEER IDEA OF A UNIVERSAL HISTORY ON A COSMOPOLITICAL PLAN Preface to THE METAPHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS OF NATURAL SCIENCE PERPETUAL PEACE: A Philosophical Essay OF THE INJUSTICE OF COUNTERFEITING BOOKS Criticism: CRITICISM OF THE KANTIAN PHILOSOPHY by Arthur Schopenhauer Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher, who, according to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy is "the central figure of modern philosophy." Kant argued that fundamental concepts of the human mind structure human experience, that reason is the source of morality, that aesthetics arises from a faculty of disinterested judgment, that space and time are forms of our understanding, and that the world as it is "in-itself" is unknowable. Kant took himself to have effected a Copernican revolution in philosophy, akin to Copernicus' reversal of the age-old belief that the sun revolved around the earth.
"A magnificent stylist . . . a first-rate historian. Familiarity with subject matter resulting from many years of study and narrative talents exceeding those of any other Civil War historian enable him to move along swiftly and smoothly and produce a story that is informative, dramatic, and absorbingly interesting." —Dr. Bell I. Wiley, after reading the manuscript of Never Call Retreat

The final volume of Bruce Catton's monumental Centennial History of the Civil War traces the war from Fredericksburg through the succeeding grim and relentless campaigns to the Courthouse at Appomattox and the death of Lincoln.

This is an eloquent study of the bitterest years of the war when death slashed the country with a brutality unparalleled in the history of the United States. Through the kaleidoscope tone and temper of the struggle, two men, different in stature, but similar in dedication to their awesome tasks, grappled with the burden of being leaders both in politics and war. In the north Lincoln remained resolute in the belief that a house divided against itself could not stand. His determination and uncanny vision of the destiny of the country and its people far transcended the plaguing tensions, fears, and frustrations of his cabinet and Congress. Mr. Lincoln’s use of vast resources is brilliantly contrasted to Davis’s valiant struggle for political and economic stability in a hopelessly fragmented and underdeveloped south. Though Davis never lacked for spirit and dedication, his handicaps were severe. This was not a war to be won by static ideals and romanticism. As Mr. Lincoln managed to expand and intensify the ideals that sustained the Northern war effort, Mr. Davis was never able to enlarge the South’s. This was a war to be won by flexibility in though, strength in supplies, and battles. And so they were fought––Fredericksburg, The Wilderness, Chancellorsville, Vicksburg, Gettysburg.
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