A Cosmopolitanism of Nations: Giuseppe Mazzini's Writings on Democracy, Nation Building, and International Relations

Princeton University Press
1
Free sample

This anthology gathers Giuseppe Mazzini's most important essays on democracy, nation building, and international relations, including some that have never before been translated into English. These neglected writings remind us why Mazzini was one of the most influential political thinkers of the nineteenth century--and why there is still great benefit to be derived from a careful analysis of what he had to say. Mazzini (1805-1872) is best known today as the inspirational leader of the Italian Risorgimento. But, as this book demonstrates, he also made a vital contribution to the development of modern democratic and liberal internationalist thought. In fact, Stefano Recchia and Nadia Urbinati make the case that Mazzini ought to be recognized as the founding figure of what has come to be known as liberal Wilsonianism.

The writings collected here show how Mazzini developed a sophisticated theory of democratic nation building--one that illustrates why democracy cannot be successfully imposed through military intervention from the outside. He also speculated, much more explicitly than Immanuel Kant, about how popular participation and self-rule within independent nation-states might result in lasting peace among democracies. In short, Mazzini believed that universal aspirations toward human freedom, equality, and international peace could best be realized through independent nation-states with homegrown democratic institutions. He thus envisioned what one might today call a genuine cosmopolitanism of nations.

Read more

About the author

Stefano Recchia is a PhD candidate in political science at Columbia University. Nadia Urbinati is the Nell and Herbert M. Singer Professor of Contemporary Civilization and Professor of Political Theory at Columbia.
Read more

Reviews

5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
Read more
Published on
Aug 17, 2009
Read more
Pages
264
Read more
ISBN
9781400831319
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
History / Modern / General
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Democracy
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Giuseppe Mazzini
At the time of his death in March of 1872, The Times of London recorded that "We have to announce to-day the death of a man who in his time has played a most singularly part upon the theatre of European politics; on whose name has for years been regarded as a symbol of revolution." Giuseppe Mazzini's name today is not nearly as familiar to modern readers as he was to avid readers of the mid-Victorian age for his name was virtually synonymous with the revolutionary spirit. To his countrymen, he wrote of the innate duties of man toward God, Country and Humanity. Included in THE DUTIES OF MAN AND OTHER ESSAYS is Mazzini's passionate viewpoint on the political inevitability of The French Revolution of 1789 as well as giving the Italian "workingman" a taste of his revolutionary political ideology on the fundamental rights of individual conscience. GIUSEPPE MAZZINI, 1805-1872, was an Italian nationalist and patriot, who, together with Giuseppe Garibaldi, Camillo Benso di Cavour, and Victor Emmanuel II, is considered one of the "patron saints" of the Italian Risorgimento. He committed himself passionately to the cause of Italian independence and unity, and as a result, was forced into exile in 1831 for his revolutionary activities. His association, Giovine Italia (Young Italy), founded in the 1830s, attracted adherents throughout the country and among Italian political exiles everywhere. No other Italian Risorgimento leader (with the exception of Giuseppe Garibaldi) enjoyed greater international renown in his time for his revolutionary vision of Italian national unity.
Barack Obama
In July 2004, Barack Obama electrified the Democratic National Convention with an address that spoke to Americans across the political spectrum. One phrase in particular anchored itself in listeners’ minds, a reminder that for all the discord and struggle to be found in our history as a nation, we have always been guided by a dogged optimism in the future, or what Obama called “the audacity of hope.”

The Audacity of Hope is Barack Obama’s call for a different brand of politics—a politics for those weary of bitter partisanship and alienated by the “endless clash of armies” we see in congress and on the campaign trail; a politics rooted in the faith, inclusiveness, and nobility of spirit at the heart of “our improbable experiment in democracy.” He explores those forces—from the fear of losing to the perpetual need to raise money to the power of the media—that can stifle even the best-intentioned politician. He also writes, with surprising intimacy and self-deprecating humor, about settling in as a senator, seeking to balance the demands of public service and family life, and his own deepening religious commitment.

At the heart of this book is Barack Obama’s vision of how we can move beyond our divisions to tackle concrete problems. He examines the growing economic insecurity of American families, the racial and religious tensions within the body politic, and the transnational threats—from terrorism to pandemic—that gather beyond our shores. And he grapples with the role that faith plays in a democracy—where it is vital and where it must never intrude. Underlying his stories about family, friends, and members of the Senate is a vigorous search for connection: the foundation for a radically hopeful political consensus.

A public servant and a lawyer, a professor and a father, a Christian and a skeptic, and above all a student of history and human nature, Barack Obama has written a book of transforming power. Only by returning to the principles that gave birth to our Constitution, he says, can Americans repair a political process that is broken, and restore to working order a government that has fallen dangerously out of touch with millions of ordinary Americans. Those Americans are out there, he writes—“waiting for Republicans and Democrats to catch up with them.”
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.