Whose Streets?: The Toronto G20 and the Challenges of Summit Protest

Between the Lines
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In June 2010 activists opposing the G20 meeting held in Toronto were greeted with arbitrary state violence on a scale never before seen in Canada. Whose Streets? is a combination of testimonials from the front lines and analyses of the broader context, an account that both reflects critically on what occurred in Toronto and looks ahead to further building our capacity for resistance.

Featuring reflections from activists who helped organize the mobilizations, demonstrators and passersby who were arbitrarily arrested and detained, and scholars committed to the theory and practice of confronting neoliberal capitalism, the collection balances critical perspective with on-the-street intensity. It offers vital insight for activists on how local organizing and global activism can come together. 

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About the author

Tom Malleson is an Assistant Professor in the Social Justice and Peace Studies Program at King’s University College at Western University. He is a long time social movement organizer, particularly within anti-poverty and migrant justice movements.

David Wachsmuth was trained as an urban planner in Toronto and is now a PhD candidate in Sociology at New York University. He is an organizer with GSOC-UAW, the union for graduate employees at NYU.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Between the Lines
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Pages
23
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ISBN
9781926662824
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Civics & Citizenship
Political Science / Essays
Political Science / Law Enforcement
Political Science / Political Freedom
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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