Black Women and Social Justice Education

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 Focuses on Black women’s experiences and expertise in order to advance educational philosophy and provide practical tools for social justice pedagogy.
Black Women and Social Justice Education explores Black women’s experiences and expertise in teaching and learning about justice in a range of formal and informal educational settings. Linking historical accounts with groundbreaking contributions by new and rising leaders in the field, it examines, evaluates, establishes, and reinforces Black women’s commitment to social justice in education at all levels. Authors offer resource guides, personal reflections, bibliographies, and best practices for broad use and reference in communities, schools, universities, and nonprofit organizations. Collectively, their work promises to further enrich social justice education (SJE)—a critical pedagogy that combines intersectionality and human rights perspectives—and to deepen our understanding of the impact of SJE innovations on the humanities, social sciences, higher education, school development, and the broader professional world. This volume expands discussions of academic institutions and the communities they were built to serve.

“This is an exciting and engaging text that provides invaluable insights and strategies used by Black women as they engage in their justice work. These strategies will be helpful for diversity trainers, social justice educators, administrators, and anyone interested in resisting oppression and furthering social justice goals in higher education.” — Sabrina Ross, coeditor of Beyond Retention: Cultivating Spaces of Equity, Justice, and Fairness for Women of Color in U.S. Higher Education

“Uplifting, powerful, and inspirational.” — Tara L. Parker, coauthor of The State of Developmental Education: Higher Education and Public Policy Priorities
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About the author

 Stephanie Y. Evans is Professor and Chair of African American Studies, Africana Women’s Studies, and History at Clark Atlanta University. Her books include Black Women’s Mental Health: Balancing Strength and Vulnerability (coedited with Kanika Bell and Nsenga K. Burton) and African Americans and Community Engagement in Higher Education: Community Service, Service-Learning, and Community-Based Research(coedited with Colette M. Taylor, Michelle R. Dunlap, and DeMond S. Miller), both also published by SUNY Press. Andrea D. Domingue is Assistant Dean of Students for Diversity and Inclusion at Davidson College. Tania D. Mitchell is Associate Professor of Higher Education at the University of Minnesota. She is the coeditor (with Krista M. Soria) of Educating for Citizenship and Social Justice: Practices for Community Engagement at Research Universities.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Feb 1, 2019
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Pages
396
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ISBN
9781438472966
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Discrimination & Race Relations
Social Science / Minority Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The chilling truth is that his story could have been mine. The tragedy is that my story could have been his.

Two kids named Wes Moore were born blocks apart within a year of each other. Both grew up fatherless in similar Baltimore neighborhoods and had difficult childhoods; both hung out on street corners with their crews; both ran into trouble with the police. How, then, did one grow up to be a Rhodes Scholar, decorated veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader, while the other ended up a convicted murderer serving a life sentence? Wes Moore, the author of this fascinating book, sets out to answer this profound question. In alternating narratives that take readers from heart-wrenching losses to moments of surprising redemption, The Other Wes Moore tells the story of a generation of boys trying to find their way in a hostile world.

BONUS: This edition contains a new afterword and a The Other Wes Moore discussion guide.

Praise for The Other Wes Moore

“Moving and inspiring, The Other Wes Moore is a story for our times.”—Alex Kotlowitz, author of There Are No Children Here
 
“A tense, compelling story and an inspirational guide for all who care about helping young people.”—Juan Williams, author of Enough
 
“This should be required reading for anyone who is trying to understand what is happening to young men in our inner cities.”—Geoffrey Canada, author of Fist Stick Knife Gun
 
“The Other Wes Moore gets to the heart of the matter on faith, education, respect, the hard facts of incarceration, and the choices and challenges we all face. It’s educational and inspiring.”—Ben Carson, M.D., author of Gifted Hands
 
“Wes Moore is destined to become one of the most powerful and influential leaders of this century. You need only read this book to understand why.”—William S. Cohen, former U.S. senator and secretary of defense

“This intriguing narrative is enlightening, encouraging, and empowering. Read these words, absorb their meanings, and create your own plan to act and leave a legacy.”—Tavis Smiley, from the Afterword
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The twentieth anniversary edition of the classic story of an incredible group of students and the teacher who inspired them, featuring updates on the students’ lives, new journal entries, and an introduction by Erin Gruwell
 
Now a public television documentary, Freedom Writers: Stories from the Heart
 
In 1994, an idealistic first-year teacher in Long Beach, California, named Erin Gruwell confronted a room of “unteachable, at-risk” students. She had intercepted a note with an ugly racial caricature and angrily declared that this was precisely the sort of thing that led to the Holocaust. She was met by uncomprehending looks—none of her students had heard of one of the defining moments of the twentieth century. So she rebooted her entire curriculum, using treasured books such as Anne Frank’s diary as her guide to combat intolerance and misunderstanding. Her students began recording their thoughts and feelings in their own diaries, eventually dubbing themselves the “Freedom Writers.”
 
Consisting of powerful entries from the students’ diaries and narrative text by Erin Gruwell, The Freedom Writers Diary is an unforgettable story of how hard work, courage, and determination changed the lives of a teacher and her students. In the two decades since its original publication, the book has sold more than one million copies and inspired a major motion picture Freedom Writers. And now, with this twentieth-anniversary edition, readers are brought up to date on the lives of the Freedom Writers, as they blend indispensable takes on social issues with uplifting stories of attending college—and watch their own children follow in their footsteps. The Freedom Writers Diary remains a vital read for anyone who believes in second chances.
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