The Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species: Local Authority and International Policy

Quid Pro Books
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Debates over U.S. government policy frequently follow a
philosophy of devolution in authority from federal government to local
government. This concept opens the possibility of greater local involvement in
national policy implementation—and provides international treaties an
opportunity to advance global policy by incorporating the efforts of local
actors into their implementation framework. Much of international policy
involves enforcement through international-to-national linkages forming an
“implementation chain,” but devolution offers the potential to extend the
implementation chain by providing national-to-local linkages.

This book explores the nature of such linkages, taking as a
case study the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)
via its domestic analog in the U.S., the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The
analysis employs both quantitative and qualitative methods including interviews,
surveys, statistical analysis, and document review. The author concludes that
while the framework of CITES enforcement in the U.S. allows for
national-to-local extension of the CITES implementation chain, it also presents
challenges that should be addressed by international policymakers who consider
devolution as a way of assisting global policy. 

The book includes a Foreword by Scott A. Frisch, a professor of political science (and chair of the department) at California State University, Channel Islands. Frisch notes that "in this book Jonathan Liljeblad offers an enlightening and long-overdue look at the issue of local implementation of international policy.... Liljeblad is able to arrive at insightful conclusions as well as concrete recommendations for policymakers wishing to improve coordination and execution of international policies that rely on local governments for their implementation." He concludes, "Liljeblad's recommendations would foster a climate of greater understanding of the connections between international and domestic policy and should be heeded by all levels of government to remove unnecessary roadblocks that can derail implementation."

A new study in the international protection of animal and plant species, presented by Quid Pro Books. 

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About the author

JONATHAN LILJEBLAD studies the connections between local and global phenomena using interdisciplinary methods in law, politics, and sociology. His focus is on the linkages between international legal instruments and local political, economic, social, and cultural contexts. His work uses quantitative and qualitative social science research methods to study the law. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and a J.D., both from the University of Southern California. He received his B.S. from the California Institute of Technology. He has taught courses in international law, international environmental policy, and international human rights at the University of California—Los Angeles, the University of Southern California, and Loyola Marymount University. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the School of Law of the University of New England in New South Wales, Australia.

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Additional Information

Quid Pro Books
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Published on
Jan 14, 2014
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Law / Commercial / International Trade
Law / Environmental
Law / International
Nature / Endangered Species
Political Science / International Relations / Treaties
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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