Build Your Own Database

American Library Association
Free sample

What makes a database good?

Quality, as applied to databases, is not something abstract or theoretical. It is a very practical issue. In the simplest terms, a database is of high quality if it's useful to the community it's designed to serve.

Commercial databases serve some needs of your user community, but not all. For instance, you may wish to create databases of community resources or unique documents in your collection. With ever-improving computer technology, it's easier than ever to create a database. However, the challenges of creating a good database remain.

In Build Your Own Database, authors Peter Jacso and F. W. Lancaster, show you how to create quality in databases with advice in such areas as:

  • designing content while considering domain of coverage, accessibilty, currency, critical mass, and other criteria;

  • constructing databases that facilitate retrieval of useful information;

  • selecting the best software tools for your needs;

  • indexing your data; and

  • determining how software features affect database capabilities.
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About the author

PeTER JACSo is Chair and Associate Professor, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Hawaii, Honolulu. He received the Outstanding Information Science Teacher Award of the American Society for Information Science (ASIS), the Pratt-Severn Faculty Innovation Award, and the Louis Shores-Oryx Press Award for excellence in reviewing databases.

Lancaster is Professor Emeritus in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois.

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Additional Information

Publisher
American Library Association
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Published on
Mar 31, 1999
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Pages
163
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ISBN
9780838907504
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Databases / General
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The Data Vault was invented by Dan Linstedt at the U.S. Department of Defense, and the standard has been successfully applied to data warehousing projects at organizations of different sizes, from small to large-size corporations. Due to its simplified design, which is adapted from nature, the Data Vault 2.0 standard helps prevent typical data warehousing failures.

"Building a Scalable Data Warehouse" covers everything one needs to know to create a scalable data warehouse end to end, including a presentation of the Data Vault modeling technique, which provides the foundations to create a technical data warehouse layer. The book discusses how to build the data warehouse incrementally using the agile Data Vault 2.0 methodology. In addition, readers will learn how to create the input layer (the stage layer) and the presentation layer (data mart) of the Data Vault 2.0 architecture including implementation best practices. Drawing upon years of practical experience and using numerous examples and an easy to understand framework, Dan Linstedt and Michael Olschimke discuss:

How to load each layer using SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS), including automation of the Data Vault loading processes.

Important data warehouse technologies and practices.

Data Quality Services (DQS) and Master Data Services (MDS) in the context of the Data Vault architecture. Provides a complete introduction to data warehousing, applications, and the business context so readers can get-up and running fast Explains theoretical concepts and provides hands-on instruction on how to build and implement a data warehouseDemystifies data vault modeling with beginning, intermediate, and advanced techniquesDiscusses the advantages of the data vault approach over other techniques, also including the latest updates to Data Vault 2.0 and multiple improvements to Data Vault 1.0


Component Database Systems is a collection of invited chapters by the researchers making the most influential contributions in the database industry's trend toward componentization


This book represents the sometimes-divergent, sometimes-convergent approaches taken by leading database vendors as they seek to establish commercially viable componentization strategies. Together, these contributions form the first book devoted entirely to the technical and architectural design of component-based database systems. In addition to detailing the current state of their research, the authors also take up many of the issues affecting the likely future directions of component databases.


If you have a stake in the evolution of any of today's leading database systems, this book will make fascinating reading. It will also help prepare you for the technology that is likely to become widely available over the next several years.

* Is comprised of contributions from the field's most highly respected researchers, including key figures at IBM, Oracle, Informix, Microsoft, and POET.
* Represents the entire spectrum of approaches taken by leading software companies working on DBMS componentization strategies.
* Covers component-focused architectures, methods for hooking components into an overall system, and support for component development.
* Examines the component technologies that are most valuable to Web-based and multimedia databases.
* Presents a thorough classification and overview of component database systems.

This book brings all of the elements of database design together in a single volume, saving the reader the time and expense of making multiple purchases. It consolidates both introductory and advanced topics, thereby covering the gamut of database design methodology ? from ER and UML techniques, to conceptual data modeling and table transformation, to storing XML and querying moving objects databases.

The proposed book expertly combines the finest database design material from the Morgan Kaufmann portfolio. Individual chapters are derived from a select group of MK books authored by the best and brightest in the field. These chapters are combined into one comprehensive volume in a way that allows it to be used as a reference work for those interested in new and developing aspects of database design.

This book represents a quick and efficient way to unite valuable content from leading database design experts, thereby creating a definitive, one-stop-shopping opportunity for customers to receive the information they would otherwise need to round up from separate sources.Chapters contributed by various recognized experts in the field let the reader remain up to date and fully informed from multiple viewpoints.Details multiple relational models and modeling languages, enhancing the reader’s technical expertise and familiarity with design-related requirements specification. Coverage of both theory and practice brings all of the elements of database design together in a single volume, saving the reader the time and expense of making multiple purchases.
In the years following her role as the lead author of the international bestseller, Limits to Growth—the first book to show the consequences of unchecked growth on a finite planet— Donella Meadows remained a pioneer of environmental and social analysis until her untimely death in 2001.

Thinking in Systems, is a concise and crucial book offering insight for problem solving on scales ranging from the personal to the global. Edited by the Sustainability Institute’s Diana Wright, this essential primer brings systems thinking out of the realm of computers and equations and into the tangible world, showing readers how to develop the systems-thinking skills that thought leaders across the globe consider critical for 21st-century life.

Some of the biggest problems facing the world—war, hunger, poverty, and environmental degradation—are essentially system failures. They cannot be solved by fixing one piece in isolation from the others, because even seemingly minor details have enormous power to undermine the best efforts of too-narrow thinking.

While readers will learn the conceptual tools and methods of systems thinking, the heart of the book is grander than methodology. Donella Meadows was known as much for nurturing positive outcomes as she was for delving into the science behind global dilemmas. She reminds readers to pay attention to what is important, not just what is quantifiable, to stay humble, and to stay a learner.

In a world growing ever more complicated, crowded, and interdependent, Thinking in Systems helps readers avoid confusion and helplessness, the first step toward finding proactive and effective solutions.

Every day researchers face an onslaught of irrelevant, inaccurate, and sometimes insidious information. While new technologies provide powerful tools for accessing knowledge, not all information is created equal. Valuable information may be tucked away on a shelf, buried on the hundredth page of search results, or hidden behind digital barriers. With so many obstacles to effective research, it is vital that higher education students master the art of inquiry.

Information Now is an innovative approach to information literacy that will reinvent the way college students think about research. Instead of the typical textbook format, it uses illustrations, humor, and reflective exercises to teach students how to become savvy researchers. Students will learn how to evaluate information, to incorporate it into their existing knowledge base, to wield it effectively, and to understand the ethical issues surrounding its use. Written by two library professionals, it incorporates concepts and skills drawn from the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education and their Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Thoroughly researched and highly engaging, Information Now offers the tools that students need to become powerful consumers and creators of information.

Whether used by a high school student tackling a big paper, an undergrad facing the newness of a university library, or a writer wanting to go beyond Google, Information Now is a powerful tool for any researcher’s arsenal.
Despite the importance of archives to the profession of history, there is very little written about actual encounters with them—about the effect that the researcher’s race, gender, or class may have on her experience within them or about the impact that archival surveillance, architecture, or bureaucracy might have on the histories that are ultimately written. This provocative collection initiates a vital conversation about how archives around the world are constructed, policed, manipulated, and experienced. It challenges the claims to objectivity associated with the traditional archive by telling stories that illuminate its power to shape the narratives that are “found” there.

Archive Stories brings together ethnographies of the archival world, most of which are written by historians. Some contributors recount their own experiences. One offers a moving reflection on how the relative wealth and prestige of Western researchers can gain them entry to collections such as Uzbekistan’s newly formed Central State Archive, which severely limits the access of Uzbek researchers. Others explore the genealogies of specific archives, from one of the most influential archival institutions in the modern West, the Archives nationales in Paris, to the significant archives of the Bakunin family in Russia, which were saved largely through the efforts of one family member. Still others explore the impact of current events on the analysis of particular archives. A contributor tells of researching the 1976 Soweto riots in the politically charged atmosphere of the early 1990s, just as apartheid in South Africa was coming to an end. A number of the essays question what counts as an archive—and what counts as history—as they consider oral histories, cyberspace, fiction, and plans for streets and buildings that were never built, for histories that never materialized.

Contributors. Tony Ballantyne, Marilyn Booth, Antoinette Burton, Ann Curthoys, Peter Fritzsche, Durba Ghosh, Laura Mayhall, Jennifer S. Milligan, Kathryn J. Oberdeck, Adele Perry, Helena Pohlandt-McCormick, John Randolph, Craig Robertson, Horacio N. Roque Ramírez, Jeff Sahadeo, Reneé Sentilles

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