Cat Musculature: A Photographic Atlas

University of Chicago Press
Free sample

This series of brilliant photographs shows the dissection of the cat musculature. It is designed for use in conjunction with the third edition of Hyman's Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy, edited by Marvalee Wake, although it can be used with other textbooks. Every possible step has been taken to make the photographs easy to interpret and to follow. Reference indications to the Wake texts are included, and also concise data on the origin, insertion, and action of each muscle. The scale is such that in most cases no more than five muscles are shown per photograph, thus simplifying the task of visualizing the individual muscles. An invaluable aid for every student of cat anatomy.
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Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Aug 10, 2012
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Pages
32
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ISBN
9780226112398
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / General
Science / Laboratory Techniques
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / Mammals
Science / Study & Teaching
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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An unforgettable journey of scientific discovery, The Elephant's Secret Sense takes you deep into the wilds of Namibia, from the tops of isolated, desert observation towers to the jaws and claws of ravenous lions to aerial expeditions and dusty highways, where the naturalists do their difficult work in a troubled land threatened by expanding human populations and unstable politics. Resonant with the powerful calls of the mysterious elephant, this is a story about the resilience of nature and the inspiring, astonishing, and often heartbreaking places where humans and wild animals come together.
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