The Former Yugoslavia's Diverse Peoples: A Reference Sourcebook

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At the end of the 20th century, interregional conflicts in the former Yugoslavia culminated with Slobodon Miloflevic's campaign of ethnic cleansing, which led to NATO intervention and ultimately revolution. What ignited these conflicts? What can we learn from them about introducing democracy in multiethnic regions? What does the future hold for the region?

To answer these questions, this timely volume examines the ethnic history of the former Yugoslavia. From the settlement of the South Slavs in the 6th century to the present--paying special attention to the post-World War II era, the crisis and democratization in the 1980s, and the disintegration of the country in the early 1990s. This comprehensive single volume traces the bloody history of the region through to the fragile alliances of its present-day countries.

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About the author

Matjaz Klemencic is professor of history at the University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia and the University of Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.

Mitja Zagar is director of the Institute for Ethnic Studies in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and professor of social sciences at the University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

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Additional Information

Publisher
ABC-CLIO
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Published on
Dec 31, 2004
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Pages
426
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ISBN
9781576072943
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Reference
Reference / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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THESIS ON CYBERJAYA: HEGEMONY AND UTOPIANISM IN A SOUTHEAST ASIAN STATE by Azly Abdul Rahman a dissertation on "cybernating nations" submitted to Columbia University, New York (2004) This book, maintaine in its original dissertation format explores the concepts of hegemony and utopianism in the conceptualization of a technopole in a Southeast Asian state. I describe how cybernetics flow transculturally and is inscribed onto human consciousness as illustrated in the case of Malaysias grand-scale real estate project: Silicon Valley-inspired Multimedia Super Corridor (The MSC). I focus on the new economic nerve, Cyberjaya and the administrative capital, Putrajaya to investigate the dimensions of hegemony and utopianism My guiding questions were: what variant of hegemony is emerging? And what is the nature of the utopianism involved? Drawing inspiration from dialectical materialism, I designed a mixed-method approach in this study. The ensemble of methods used are Grubers Evolving Systems Approach to the study of an individual, semiotic analysis of visual images, and thematic analysis of speeches. This is a four-part dissertation. In Part I) I discuss the background of this study and review related sensitizing concepts (particularly hegemony and utopianism). In Part 2, I look at the history of Malaysia and the origin of the MSC. Using Grubers Case Study Approach, I then analyze the authoritarianism of Mahathir Mohamad, the author of the MSC project. In Part 3), using semiotics and thematic analyses. I describe how ideology is inscribed by looking at first, how cybernetics mutates with the recipient state, next, changes social relations of production, and finally produces and reproduces consciousness. I explore how foreign industrial and cultural complexes are installed and how they become ideological installations. In Part 4), I discuss my findings, develop propositions, outline a Theory of Hegemonic Formulations and suggest a set of tools to analyze how concepts permeate transculturally. I conclude my study with a reflection on Malaysias MSC after the retirement of Mahathir Mohamad. I propose that hegemony is a complex, kaleidoscopic, and multidimensional yet discernable and analyzable construct. Hegemony operates at the levels of language, politics, and systems of education, and helps define, institutionalize, and ritualize authoritarian leadership. Utopianism is one formulated by ideology, nationalism, and technological determinism. The interplay between authoritarianism and cybernetic systems sustain the culture of hegemony which then helps reproduce newer forms of Oriental Despotism.
In certain neighborhoods of New York City, an immigrant may live out his or her entire life without even becoming fluent in English. From the Russians of Brooklyn's Brighton Beach to the Dominicans of Manhattan's Washington Heights, New York is arguably the most ethnically diverse city in the world. Yet no wide-ranging ethnic history of the city has ever been attempted.

In All the Nations Under Heaven, Frederick Binder and David Reimers trace the shifting tides of New York's ethnic past, from its beginnings as a Dutch trading outpost to the present age where Third World immigration has given the population a truly global character. All the Nations Under Heaven explores the processes of cultural adaptation to life in New York, giving a lively account of immigrants new and old, and of the streets and neighborhoods they claimed and transformed.

All the Nations Under Heaven provides a comprehensive look at the unique cultural identities that have wrought changes on the city over nearly four centuries since Europeans first landed on the Atlantic shore. While detailing the various efforts to retain a cultural heritage, the book also looks at how ethnic and racial groups have interacted -- and clashed -- over the years.

From the influx of Irish and Germans in the nineteenth century to the recent arrival of Caribbean and Asian ethnic groups in large numbers, All the Nations Under Heaven explores the social, cultural, political, and economic lives of immigrants as they sought to form their own communities and struggled to define their identities within the grwonig heterogeneity of New York. In this timely, provocative book, Binder and Reimers offer insight into the cultural mosaic of New York at the turn of the millennium, where despite a civic pride that emphasizes the goals of diversity and tolerance, racial and ethnic conflict continue to shatter visions of peaceful coexistence.

This explosive new book challenges many of the long-prevailing assumptions about blacks, about Jews, about Germans, about slavery, and about education. Plainly written, powerfully reasoned, and backed with a startling array of documented facts, Black Rednecks and White Liberals takes on not only the trendy intellectuals of our times but also such historic interpreters of American life as Alexis de Tocqueville and Frederick Law Olmsted. In a series of long essays, this book presents an in-depth look at key beliefs behind many mistaken and dangerous actions, policies, and trends. It presents eye-opening insights into the historical development of the ghetto culture that is today wrongly seen as a unique black identity--a culture cheered on toward self-destruction by white liberals who consider themselves "friends" of blacks. An essay titled "The Real History of Slavery" presents a jolting re-examination of that tragic institution and the narrow and distorted way it is too often seen today. The reasons for the venomous hatred of Jews, and of other groups like them in countries around the world, are explored in an essay that asks, "Are Jews Generic?" Misconceptions of German history in general, and of the Nazi era in particular, are also re-examined. So too are the inspiring achievements and painful tragedies of black education in the United States. "Black Rednecks and White Liberals" is the capstone of decades of outstanding research and writing on racial and cultural issues by Thomas Sowell.
* Longlisted for the National Book Award * Winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award * A New York Times Notable Book * A Washington Post Notable Book * An NPR Best Book of 2017 * A Los Angeles Times Best Book of 2017 * An Atlanta Journal-Constitution Best Southern Book of 2017 *

This extraordinary New York Times bestseller reexamines a pivotal event of the civil rights movement—the 1955 lynching of Emmett Till—“and demands that we do the one vital thing we aren’t often enough asked to do with history: learn from it” (The Atlantic).

In 1955, white men in the Mississippi Delta lynched a fourteen-year-old from Chicago named Emmett Till. His murder was part of a wave of white terrorism in the wake of the 1954 Supreme Court decision that declared public school segregation unconstitutional. Only weeks later, Rosa Parks thought about young Emmett as she refused to move to the back of a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Five years later, Black students who called themselves “the Emmett Till generation” launched sit-in campaigns that turned the struggle for civil rights into a mass movement. Till’s lynching became the most notorious hate crime in American history.

But what actually happened to Emmett Till—not the icon of injustice, but the flesh-and-blood boy? Part detective story, part political history, The Blood of Emmett Till “unfolds like a movie” (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution), drawing on a wealth of new evidence, including a shocking admission of Till’s innocence from the woman in whose name he was killed. “Jolting and powerful” (The Washington Post), the book “provides fresh insight into the way race has informed and deformed our democratic institutions” (Diane McWhorter, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Carry Me Home) and “calls us to the cause of justice today” (Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II, president of the North Carolina NAACP).
A landmark in the conversation about race and religion in America.

"They put him to death by hanging him on a tree." Acts 10:39

The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this powerful new work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk. Both the cross and the lynching tree represent the worst in human beings and at the same time a thirst for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning. While the lynching tree symbolized white power and "black death," the cross symbolizes divine power and "black life" God overcoming the power of sin and death. For African Americans, the image of Jesus, hung on a tree to die, powerfully grounded their faith that God was with them, even in the suffering of the lynching era.

In a work that spans social history, theology, and cultural studies, Cone explores the message of the spirituals and the power of the blues; the passion and of Emmet Till and the engaged vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.; he invokes the spirits of Billie Holliday and Langston Hughes, Fannie Lou Hamer and Ida B. Well, and the witness of black artists, writers, preachers, and fighters for justice. And he remembers the victims, especially the 5,000 who perished during the lynching period. Through their witness he contemplates the greatest challenge of any Christian theology to explain how life can be made meaningful in the face of death and injustice.

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