A Sparrowhawk's Lament: How British Breeding Birds of Prey Are Faring

Princeton University Press
Free sample

Britain is home to fifteen species of breeding birds of prey, from the hedgerow-hopping Sparrowhawk to the breathtaking White-tailed Eagle. In this handsomely illustrated book, acclaimed British filmmaker and naturalist David Cobham offers unique and deeply personal insights into Britain's birds of prey and how they are faring today. He delves into the history of these magnificent birds and talks in depth with the scientists and conservationists who are striving to safeguard them. In doing so, he profiles the writers, poets and filmmakers who have done so much to change the public's perception of birds of prey. There are success stories—five birds of prey that were extinct have become reestablished with viable populations—but persecution is still rife. Featuring drawings by famed wildlife artist Bruce Pearson, this book reveals why we must cherish and celebrate our birds of prey, and why we neglect them at our peril.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

David Cobham is a renowned British film and television producer and director, notable for such films as The Goshawk, The Vanishing Hedgerows and Tarka the Otter. Bruce Pearson is the author and illustrator of Troubled Waters: Trailing the Albatross, An Artist's Journey; Birdscape; and An Artist on Migration.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Jul 6, 2014
Read more
Collapse
Pages
256
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781400850211
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Nature / Animals / Birds
Nature / Birdwatching Guides
Nature / Endangered Species
Nature / Regional
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
J. A. Baker’s extraordinary classic of British nature writing

Despite the association of peregrines with the wild, outer reaches of the British Isles, The Peregrine is set on the flat marshes of the Essex coast, where J A Baker spent a long winter looking and writing about the visitors from the uplands – peregrines that spend the winter hunting the huge flocks of pigeons and waders that share the desolate landscape with them.

Including original diaries from which The Peregrine was written and its companion volume The Hill of Summer, this is a beautiful compendium of lyrical nature writing at its absolute best. Such luminaries as Richard Mabey, Robert Macfarlane, Ted Hughes and Andrew Motion have cited this as one of the most important books in 20th Century nature writing, and the bestselling author Mark Cocker has provided an introduction on the importance of Baker, his writings and the diaries – creating the essential volume of Baker's writings.

Papers, maps, and letters have recently come to light which in turn provide a little more background into J A Baker’s history. Contemporaries – particularly from his time at school in Chelmsford – have provided insights, remembering a school friend who clearly made an impact on his generation.

Among fragments of letters to Baker was one from a reader who praised a piece that Baker had written in RSPB Birds magazine in 1971. Apart from a paper on peregrines which Baker wrote for the Essex Bird Report, this article – entitled On the Essex Coast – appears to be his only other published piece of writing, and, with the agreement of the RSPB, it has been included in this updated new paperback edition of Baker’s astounding work.

Over the quarter of a century with which this book is concerned,the UK has had an extraordinarily diverse experience of monetarypolicy and monetary regimes. Monetary policy has been transformed,from attempts to control broad money from the supply side with theuse of indirect controls on banks' lending, to an almost exclusivefocus on interest rates in a context of inflation targeting. Theexchange rate has at times been fixed, at other times almostperfectly flexible, and at other times again more or less managed.Meanwhile the real economy has experienced large variations ingrowth, together with what most observers have seen as a sharp riseand then a gradual decline in the NAIRU; inflation has variedbetween 25% and 2%.

This is a book about the making of monetary policy in the UK,about how and why the monetary regimes changed over the period, andhow and why the monetary authorities took the decisions they didabout monetary growth, interest rates and the exchange rate. Itincludes separate chapters on monetary targeting, on policy in thesecond half of the 1980s, on the UK's brief membership of the ERM,on inflation targeting between 1993 and 1997, and on inflationtargeting with instrument independence since 1997. It also containsa detailed analysis of the factors that influenced interest ratedecisions and monetary policy with particular reference to theexchange rate, and an investigation of the nature and reasons forinterest rate smoothing in the UK.

"David Cobham has written an excellent history of British monetarypolicy over the final quarter of the 20th Century. His judgement ofthe political and economic context is sound and sensible. It iswell written with clear and helpful tables and charts. Besides thecareful historical reporting, Cobham adds some valuable extraresearch of his own, notably on the interaction between monetarypolicy and the exchange rate (Chapter 9) and on the reasons forinterest rate 'smoothing' (Chapter 10)."
Charles Goodhart, Norman Sosnow Professor of Banking and Financeat the London School of Economics

"...an essential guide covering everything the reader could everwant to know about the UK's turbulent monetary history over thelast quarter century"
Charles Bean, Chief Economist, Bank of England
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.