Doubt & Conviction: The Kalajzich Inquiry

Pippa Kay
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The story started in Manly, a beachside Sydney suburb, on Australia Day 1986. Megan Kalajzich was shot as she slept beside her husband, Andrew, in their family home. Two bullets were also fired into his pillow. Bill Vandenberg confessed to being the hitman and committed suicide in 1988 by hanging himself in his prison cell.

Was it a bungled murder attempt? Who was the target? Andrew, Megan or both? Controversy still surrounds this murder.

Pippa Kay probes the murder of Megan Kalajzich and subsequent conviction of her husband. Did he do it? She presents a thorough and balanced examination of the evidence and witnesses presented to the Section 475 Inquiry into Andrew's conviction.

Doubt & Conviction was launched as a paperback in 2002 by broadcaster, Alan Jones.

Excerpt from Chapter 5:

There were four people in the house the night Megan was murdered...

ANDREW: I heard two thuds. Just like that: Thud Thud. Sort of felt it and heard it. Then I smelled firecrackers, or that's what I thought of. Firecrackers. Gunpowder. But it didn't occur to me that it could be a gun. Not at first.

BUTCH: Next thing I heard Dad shouting. I can't remember what he said, but I woke up and pulled on my shorts. My grandmother was screaming. It was a wailing sort of noise. And when I came downstairs, I stood in the doorway and saw Mum. Dad was leaning over her, and when the ambulance men came he stood up and his pyjamas were covered in blood.

ANDREW: I rang the ambulance... I ran around the house, because I had a sense of someone in the house. Downstairs.

MAY CARMICHAEL: My daughter was on the bed. She was dead. Andrew was on the phone to the ambulance. I told him 'It's too late', but I don't think he heard me. I don't think he even realised I was there... Later... I asked the policeman how long he was going to leave Megan on the bed like that and he told me I'd have to bear with him for a while longer.
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About the author

 Pippa Kay is a Sydney based author. She began researching this case when it first hit the headlines in 1986 and attended the Inquiry in 1994. Many of Pippa's short stories have been published in anthologies and some have been successful in literary competitions. In 2005 Pippa also published a collection of her own short stories called Backstories. Please see her website: www.pippakay.com.au for more details.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Pippa Kay
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Published on
Mar 10, 2016
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Pages
176
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ISBN
9780975720790
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Language
English
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Genres
True Crime / General
True Crime / Murder / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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