The Planner's Utopia

Silver Layer Publications
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The planner zealously maintains absolute equality amongst the citizens under his control. But when a free woman invades his warehouse paradise, he must act decisively before she ruins everything.

"It’s better for all to have none than for some to have more."

(Also available in the short story collection "The Wrong Sort of Stories".)
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About the author

Stephen Measure is an author of unconventional satires and strange stories.

www.stephenmeasure.com

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Additional Information

Publisher
Silver Layer Publications
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Published on
Nov 5, 2018
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Pages
24
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ISBN
9781940778402
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Dystopian
Fiction / Satire
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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