The Rise of Global Health: The Evolution of Effective Collective Action

SUNY Press
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Chronicles the expanding global effort to confront public health challenges.

Since the year 2000, unprecedented resources have been committed to the complex challenge of developing global public health solutions by national governments, multilateral organizations, and civil society groups. This vast global movement is one of the most remarkable political phenomena of twenty-first-century international relations—but is it working? In The Rise of Global Health, Joshua K. Leon argues against the conventional wisdom, which argues that collective action on development issues—including controversial increases in foreign aid—is too inherently inefficient to succeed. Leon shows that public action on a global level can successfully pursue health equality. Often at the behest of grassroots activists, these disparate groups of actors are cooperating more than ever with the aim of improving our human potential through better health. Though operating at cross purposes with unequal trade agreements and other factors within the global economy harming the Global South, we learn something surprising about global health governance—it is evolving in ways more efficient than we think.
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About the author

Joshua K. Leon is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Iona College.
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Feb 10, 2015
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9781438455181
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
Social Science / Disease & Health Issues
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Sam Quinones
Winner of the NBCC Award for General Nonfiction

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In 1929, in the blue-collar city of Portsmouth, Ohio, a company built a swimming pool the size of a football field; named Dreamland, it became the vital center of the community. Now, addiction has devastated Portsmouth, as it has hundreds of small rural towns and suburbs across America--addiction like no other the country has ever faced. How that happened is the riveting story of Dreamland.

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A Million Little Pieces is an uncommonly genuine account of a life destroyed and a life reconstructed. It is also the introduction of a bold and talented literary voice.


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