Beyond Bergson Examining Race and Colonialism through the Writings of Henri Bergson: Examining Race and Colonialism through the Writings of Henri Bergson

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Examines Bergson’s work from the perspectives of critical philosophy of race and decolonial theory, placing it in conversation with theorists from Africa, the African Diaspora, and Latin America.


Building upon recent interest in Henri Bergson’s social and political philosophy, this volume offers a series of fresh and novel perspectives on Bergson’s writings through the lenses of critical philosophy of race and decolonial theory. Contributors place Bergson’s work in conversation with theorists from Africa, the African Diaspora, and Latin America to examine Bergson’s influence on literature, science studies, aesthetics, metaphysics, and social and political philosophy within these geopolitical contexts. The volume pays particular attention to both theoretical and practical forms of critical resistance work, including historical analyses of anti-racist, anti-imperialist, and anti-capitalist movements that have engaged with Bergson’s writings—for example, the Négritude movement, the Indigenismo movement, and the Peruvian Socialist Party. These historical and theoretical intersections provide a timely and innovative contribution to the existing scholarship on Bergson, and demonstrate the importance of his thought for contemporary social and political issues.


“This is an exceptionally strong volume that excites and inspires the philosophical imagination; it shows the centrality of questions of race and gender to philosophical inquiry and appropriation.” — Keith Ansell-Pearson, author of Bergson: Thinking Beyond the Human Condition

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About the author

Andrea J. Pitts is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. 

Mark William Westmoreland is a doctoral candidate and instructor of ethics and philosophy at Villanova University.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
May 1, 2019
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Pages
274
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ISBN
9781438473536
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Social
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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