Philosophy-Screens: From Cinema to the Digital Revolution

SUNY Press
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Draws from twentieth-century French thought on film and aesthetics to address the philosophical significance of the pervasiveness of screens in contemporary technological life as well as the mutation of philosophy that such a pervasiveness seems to require.


In The Flesh of Images, Mauro Carbone analyzed Merleau-Ponty’s interest in film and modern painting as it relates to his aesthetic theory and as it illuminates our contemporary relationship to images. Philosophy-Screens broadens the work undertaken in this earlier book, looking at the ideas of other twentieth-century thinkers concerning the relationship between philosophy and film, and extending that analysis to address our experience of electronic and digital screens in the twenty-first century. In the first part of the book, Carbone examines the ways that Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Lyotard, and Deleuze grappled with the philosophical significance of cinema as a novel aesthetic medium unfolding in the twentieth century. He then considers the significance of this philosophical framework for understanding the digital revolution, in particular the extent to which we are increasingly and comprehensively connected with screens. Smartphones, tablets, and computers have become a primary referential optical apparatus for everyday life in ways that influence the experience not only of seeing but also of thinking and desiring. Carbone’s Philosophy-Screens follows Deleuze’s call for “a philosophy-cinema” that can account for these fundamental changes in perception and aesthetic production, and adapts it to twenty-first-century concerns.


“Mauro Carbone is one of the very best interpreters of French philosophy in general and aesthetics in particular. This book furthers recent research he has undertaken on cinema and more specifically its significance both in twentieth-century debates in philosophy and its role in our cultural experience. This is an insightful and informative book and will be of interest to a broad spectrum of readers.” — Stephen Watson, University of Notre Dame

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About the author

Mauro Carbone is Full Professor of Philosophy at the University Jean Moulin Lyon 3 and honorary member of the Institut Universitaire de France. His books include The Flesh of Images: Merleau-Ponty between Painting and Cinema (translated by Marta Nijhuis) and An Unprecedented Deformation: Marcel Proust and the Sensible Ideas (translated by Niall Keane), both also published by SUNY Press. 

Marta Nijhuis is Lecturer in Philosophy and Theory of Images at the University Jean Moulin Lyon 3 and at EAC Lyon.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Jul 1, 2019
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Pages
166
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ISBN
9781438474663
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Aesthetics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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'Place in garden, lawn, to beautify landscape.'

When Don Featherstone's plastic pink flamingos were first advertised in the 1957 Sears catalogue, these were the instructions. The flamingos are placed on the cover of this book for another reason: to start us asking questions. That's where philosophy always begins.

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Each chapter opens using a real world example - such as Marcel Duchamp's signed urinal, The Exorcist, and the ugliest animal in the world - to introduce and illustrate the issues under discussion. These case studies serve as touchstones throughout the chapter, keeping the concepts grounded and relatable.

With its trademark conversational style, clear explanations, and wealth of supporting features, Introducing Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art is the ideal introduction to the major problems, issues, and debates in the field. Now expanded and revised for its second edition, Introducing Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art is designed to give readers the background and the tools necessary to begin asking and answering the most intriguing questions about art and beauty, even when those questions are about pink plastic flamingos.
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