Beverwijck: A Dutch Village on the American Frontier, 1652-1664

SUNY Press
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Beverwijck explores the rich history and Dutch heritage of one of North America’s oldest cities—Albany, New York. Drawing on documents translated from the colonial Dutch as well as maps, architectural drawings, and English-language sources, Janny Venema paints a lively picture of everyday life in colonial America.

In 1652, Petrus Stuyvesant, director general of New Netherland, established a court at Fort Orange, on the west side of New York State’s upper Hudson River. The area within three thousand feet of the fort became the village of Beverwijck. From the time of its establishment until 1664, when the English conquered New Netherland and changed the name of the settlement to Albany, Beverwijck underwent rapid development as newly wealthy traders, craftsmen, and other workers built houses, roads, bridges, and a school, as well as a number of inns. A well-organized system of poor relief also helped less wealthy settlers survive in the harsh colonial conditions. Venema’s careful research shows that although Beverwijck resembled villages in the Dutch Republic in many ways, it quickly took on features of the new, “American” society that was already coming into being.
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About the author

Janny Venema is a Project Associate at the New Netherland Project, which is responsible for translating the official records of the Dutch colony and promoting awareness of the Dutch role in American history.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Mar 29, 2010
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Pages
528
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ISBN
9780791485019
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
HISTORY / United States / State & Local / General
HISTORY / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA)
HISTORY / United States / State & Local / New England (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT)
History / United States / Colonial Period (1600-1775)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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