The Secret Knowledge of Water: There Are Two Easy Ways to Die in the Desert: Thirst and Drowning

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Deserts are environments that can be inhospitable even to seasoned explorers. Craig Childs has spent years in the deserts of the American West, and his treks through arid lands in search of water reveal the natural world at its most extreme.
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About the author

Craig Childs is a river guide, a field instructor in natural history, an adventurer, & a writer. His other books include "Crossing Paths: Uncommon Encounters with Animals in the Wild" (Sasquatch). He camps in the backcountry of the American West at least nine months of the year, usually living in the back of his truck, out of a river vessel, or from his backpack. He hasn't had a phone in ten years.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Back Bay Books
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Published on
Dec 14, 2008
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9780316055307
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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From the author of Apocalyptic Planet comes a vivid travelogue through prehistory, that traces the arrival of the first people in North America at least twenty thousand years ago and the artifacts that tell of their lives and fates.

In Atlas of a Lost World, Craig Childs upends our notions of where these people came from and who they were. How they got here, persevered, and ultimately thrived is a story that resonates from the Pleistocene to our modern era. The lower sea levels of the Ice Age exposed a vast land bridge between Asia and North America, but the land bridge was not the only way across. Different people arrived from different directions, and not all at the same time.

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Atlas of a Lost World chronicles the last millennia of the Ice Age, the violent oscillations and retreat of glaciers, the clues and traces that document the first encounters of early humans, and the animals whose presence governed the humans’ chances for survival. A blend of science and personal narrative reveals how much has changed since the time of mammoth hunters, and how little. Across unexplored landscapes yet to be peopled, readers will see the Ice Age, and their own age, in a whole new light.
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