The Broken Estate: Journalism and Democracy in a Post-Truth World

Bridget Williams Books
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A lack of knowledge about the world can be a very dangerous thing.


In the age of Trump, fake news and clickbait headlines, it is easy to despair about the future of journalism. The New Zealand and global media are in upheaval: the old economic models for print journalism are failing, public funding has been neglected for decades, and many major news organisations are shedding journalists.


New Zealander Mel Bunce researches and teaches journalism at the acclaimed Department of Journalism at City, University of London. Drawing upon the latest international research, Bunce provides a fresh analysis that goes beyond the usual anecdote and conjecture. Insightful and impassioned, this short book provides a much-needed assessment of the future for New Zealand journalism in a troubled world.

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About the author

Mel Bunce is a Reader in Journalism at City, University of London where she researches and teaches on the international news media. Dunedin-born, Mel worked as a columnist for the Otago Daily Times while she was a student at the University of Otago. After graduating, she won a Commonwealth Scholarship to the University of Oxford where she completed an MPhil in Development Studies, and a Doctorate in Politics. Mel is the co-editor of Africa's Media Image in the 21st Century (Routledge, 2016) and has published a number of research articles on international journalism. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Sep 19, 2019
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9780947518363
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Political Process / Media & Internet
Political Science / World / Australian & Oceanian
Social Science / Media Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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