The Orphan: A Journey to Wholeness

Fisher King Press
Free sample

The Orphan: A Journey to Wholeness addresses loneliness and the feeling of being alone in the world, two distinct characteristics that mark the life of an orphan. Regardless if we have grown up with or without parents, we are all too likely to meet such experiences in ourselves and in our daily encounters with others. With numerous case examples, Dr. Punnett describes how loneliness and the feeling of being alone tend to be repeated in later relationships and may eventually lead to states of anxiety and depression. The main purpose of this book is not to just stay within the context of the literal orphan, but also to explore its symbolic dimensions in order to provide meaning to the diverse experiences of feeling alone in the world. In accepting the orphan within, we begin to take responsibility for our own unique life journey, a privileged journey in which one can at some point in time say with pride, I am an orphan. 
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About the author

Audrey F. Punnett, PhD, is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute, Zurich with diplomas in both Child/Adolescent and Adult Analytical Psychology. She is an Associate Clinical Professor, Psychiatry, the University of California San Francisco – Fresno; Adjunct Professor, Alliant International University; Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor, and Certified Sandplay Therapist – Teacher, ISST & STA, past President of the Board of Trustees. She is a member of AGAP, serving on the Board, and the CGJI-SF, past Chair of the Infant, Child & Adolescent Training Committee (iCAT). She has lectured and given workshops on the orphan in Europe, New Zealand, Taiwan, Canada and the USA, and published in peer reviewed Journals. Dr. Punnett maintains a private practice in Fresno, California.  

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Additional Information

Publisher
Fisher King Press
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Published on
Jun 21, 2014
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Pages
178
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ISBN
9781771690171
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Education & Training
Psychology / Movements / Jungian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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Now in her mid-eighties Gilda Frantz’s shares with us what she has learned from life and from being a Jungian analyst. She has written a feeling, intuitive wise woman’s shorter version of her own Memories, Dreams, Reflections. Personal insights links essays on subjects drawn from her life and work, there is poignancy and an affirmation of indomitable spirit in her musings. She knows first hand about difficult childhoods, early widowhood, aging, death of a beloved grandchild, and closeness to the end of life. She knows about suffering and the creativity and soul growth that can go hand in hand. These are themes in her own life and in her observations of others. Sea Glass is an apt metaphor for this book—to discover why requires reading it. —Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D. author of Goddesses in Everywoman, Goddesses in Older Women, and Close to the Bone.

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Focuses on the nuances of ethical and legal standards across disciplines

Completely revised and updated to reflect the new 2014 ACA Code of Ethics and current ethics codes in psychology, social work, and marriage and family therapy. This unparalleled text guides helping professionals in the use of ethical decision-making processes as the foundation for ethical approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. The book focuses on ethical and legal challenges and standards across multiple professions emphasizing counseling, and including the professions of psychology, social work, and marriage and family therapy. It not only identifies relevant ethical issues in clinical mental health, rehabilitation, group, school, addictions counseling, and career counseling, it also addresses couple and family therapy, clinical supervision, and forensics. The text illuminates the particular application of ethical standards within each specialty.

The book features five new sections that clearly define how ethical standards are interpreted and applied: Privacy, Confidentiality, and Privileged Communication; Informed Consent; Roles and Relationships with Clients; Professional Responsibility; and Counselor Competency. Under the umbrella of each broad topic, the particular nuances of ethical standards within each specialty are analyzed to facilitate comparison across all specialties and settings. The text also addresses current issues in office and administrative practices, technology, and forensic practice that are crucial to school, clinical, and private practice settings. Compelling case studies illustrate the connection between ethical decision-making models and ethical practice. Learning objectives, a comprehensive review of scholarly literature, and a robust ancillary package for educators contribute to the fourth edition's value for use in upper-level undergraduate and graduate classrooms.

New to the Fourth Edition:

Comprehensive reorganization and reconceptualization of content

Reflects new 2014 ACA Code of Ethics

Includes five new chapters on Privacy, Confidentiality, and Privileged Communication; Informed Consent; Roles and Relationships with Clients; Professional Responsibility; and Counselor Competency.

Emphasizes specialty practice organized by professional standards

Facilitates comparison of standards across disciplines

Addresses new issues in office, administrative, technology, and forensic practice

Key Features:

Delivers an unequaled overview of ethical decision-making in counseling and psychotherapy

Defines how ethical standards are interpreted and applied in specialty practice

Describes how to avoid, address, and solve serious ethical and legal dilemmas

Includes learning objectives, case studies, and scholarly literature reviews

Offers robust ancillary package with Instructor's Manual, Test Bank, and Power Point Slides

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