Authoring Autism: On Rhetoric and Neurological Queerness

Duke University Press
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In Authoring Autism Melanie Yergeau defines neurodivergence as an identity—neuroqueerness—rather than an impairment. Using a queer theory framework, Yergeau notes the stereotypes that deny autistic people their humanity and the chance to define themselves while also challenging cognitive studies scholarship and its reification of the neurological passivity of autistics. She also critiques early intensive behavioral interventions—which have much in common with gay conversion therapy—and questions the ableist privileging of intentionality and diplomacy in rhetorical traditions. Using storying as her method, she presents an alternative view of autistic rhetoricity by foregrounding the cunning rhetorical abilities of autistics and by framing autism as a narrative condition wherein autistics are the best-equipped people to define their experience. Contending that autism represents a queer way of being that simultaneously embraces and rejects the rhetorical, Yergeau shows how autistic people queer the lines of rhetoric, humanity, and agency. In so doing, she demonstrates how an autistic rhetoric requires the reconceptualization of rhetoric’s very essence.
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About the author

Melanie Yergeau is Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Dec 22, 2017
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Pages
312
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ISBN
9780822372189
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / LGBT Studies / Gay Studies
Social Science / People with Disabilities
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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