Strategic Cousins: Australian and Canadian Expeditionary Forces and the British and American Empires

McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Blaxland traces the shift from ties with the British Empire, which led Canadian and Australian forces to fight in the Boer War, the two World Wars, and Korea, to their contribution alongside the United States in Afghanistan. Using late twentieth-century concepts of policy, military strategy, operations, and tactics, he reveals that Canada and Australia have had remarkably comparable experiences while supporting their key allies. Although the two nations have at times chosen divergent courses, their paths since the end of the Cold War have largely converged – and closer collaboration could increase their influence and effectiveness and benefit their allies.
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About the author

Lieutenant Colonel John C. Blaxland is an Australian Army officer living in Canberra. His publications include Organising an Army: The Australian Experience, 1957-1965.

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Additional Information

Publisher
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Published on
Jul 4, 2006
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Pages
432
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ISBN
9780773576940
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / Canada
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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