The Spirit of Sounds: The Unique Art of Ostad Elahi (1895-1974)

Associated University Presse
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An unrivaled master of the sacred art of tanbour, an ancient Kurdish lute with an unusually captivating sonority, Ostad Elahi considered his music above all as a means of delving within, discovering truths, and reaching the stage of divine love.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Associated University Presse
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Published on
Dec 31, 2003
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Pages
204
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ISBN
9780845348840
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Music / Ethnomusicology
Music / Religious / Muslim
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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