The Scripture Doctrine of Original Sin Proposed to Free and Candid Examination: In Three Parts

J. Waugh
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J. Waugh
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Published on
Dec 31, 1750
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Pages
495
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English
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Taylor, John. An Inquiry into the Principles and Policy of the Government of the United States. Fredericksburg: Green and Cady, 1814. With an introduction by Roy Franklin Nichols, Yale University Press, 1950. 562 pp. Reprinted 1998 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 98-11147. ISBN 1-886363-46-3. Cloth. $80. * Considered a political writing that "deserves to rank among the two or three really historic contributions to political science which have been produced in the United States" (Beard, Economic Origins of Jeffersonian Democracy), this work was originally conceived in 1794 as a response to John Adams' A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America and first published in 1814. He rejects the concept of "a natural aristocracy" of "paper and patronage" and a federal government based on a system of debt and taxes. Opposed to the extent of power awarded to the executive office, he calls for a shortening of the terms of the president and all elected officers. He considers the American government to be one of divided powers rather than classes, and its agents responsible to sovereign people alone. Taylor [1753-1824] was known as "John Taylor of Caroline County, Virginia" and served in the Continental Army and later in the Virginia House of Delegates, then served three separate terms as member of the United States Senate. He is considered to be one of the nation's greatest philosophers of agrarian liberalism, and wrote extensively on this topic as well as on political matters. One of the nation's first proponents of states rights, in 1798 he introduced into the Virginia legislature resolutions in support of the doctrine of delegated powers and the right of states to respond to confrontations by other powers. Dictionary of American Biography IX:331. Sabin, A Dictionary of Books Relating to America 94491. Cohen, Bibliography of Early American Law 5823.
Taylor, John. Construction Construed and Constitutions Vindicated. Richmond: printed by Shepherd & Pollard, 1820. iv, 344pp. Reprinted 1998 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 97-49411. ISBN 1-886363-43-9. Cloth. $65. * One of the major works of the Virginian John Taylor of Caroline [1753-1824]. Little-known today, Taylor's work is of great significance in the political and intellectual history of the South and is essential for understanding the constitutional theories that Southerners asserted to justify secession in 1861. Taylor fought in the Continental army during the American Revolution and served briefly in the Virginia House of Delegates and as a U.S. Senator. It was as a writer on constitutional, political, and agricultural questions, however, that Taylor gained prominence. He joined with Thomas Jefferson and other agrarian advocates of states' rights and a strict construction of the Constitution in the political battles of the 1790s. His first published writings argued against Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton's financial program. Construction Construed and Constitutions Vindicated was Taylor's response to a series of post-War of 1812 developments including John Marshall's Supreme Court decision in McCulloch v. Maryland, the widespread issuance of paper money by banks, proposals for a protective tariff, and the attempt to bar slavery from Missouri. Along with many other Southerners, Taylor feared that these and other measures following in the train of Hamilton's financial system, were undermining the foundations of American republicanism. He saw them as the attempt of an "artificial capitalist sect" to corrupt the virtue of the American people and upset the proper constitutional balance between state and federal authority in favor of a centralized national government. Taylor wrote, "If the means to which the government of the union may resort for executing the power confided to it, are unlimited, it may easily select such as will impair or destroy the powers confided to the state governments." Jefferson, who noted that "Col. Taylor and myself have rarely, if ever, differed in any political principle of importance," considered Construction Construed and Constitutions Vindicated "the most logical retraction of our governments to the original and true principles of the Constitutio
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