Iroquois Wars I

Annals of Colonial North America

Book 2
Arx Publishing, LLC
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This volume chronicles the phenomenal rise of the Iroquois Confederacy during the "Beaver Wars" of the 17th century. In what were perhaps the greatest series of military conquests in Native American history, the Five Nations of the Iroquois subjugated and destroyed enemy tribes stretching over a vast area from eastern Canada to Virginia to Illinois, forever changing the cultural map of Eastern North America.
The accounts included in this volume cover the underpinnings of the wars and the initial conflicts which led to a century of hostilities as the Iroquois emerged as the dominant force that was both respected and dreaded by neighboring tribes and the European colonial powers alike. Additional extracts will touch upon the evolution of Native American fighting techniques, strategy and tactics, treatment of prisoners, and the influence of the various European colonies.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Arx Publishing, LLC
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Published on
Dec 31, 2003
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Pages
423
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ISBN
9781889758343
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Native American
History / United States / Colonial Period (1600-1775)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Iroquois Wars II continues the chronicle of the rise of the Iroquois Confederacy during the “Beaver Wars” of the 17th century, using primary source extracts from the Jesuit Relations. The accounts included in this volume cover the incredible series of victories won by the Iroquois over neighboring tribes following the defeat and collapse of their Huron enemies in 1650. Iroquois war parties fought wide-ranging campaigns against enemy tribes and Europeans alike in practically every state east of the Mississippi. In doing so, they destroyed or displaced dozens of tribes, many of which are known to history by their names alone. Extracts covering the stunning defeat of the Neutral confederacy in the 1650s and of the long war with the Susquehannocks (Andaste) are prominently featured. Several detailed extracts covering the dramatic war between the Iroquois and the Eries are also included, along with numerous accounts of the French invasions of Iroquoia in the 1660s and attempts to forge a lasting peace.

   An introduction written by the editors helps place the extracts in their historical context and provides a list of further reading material. Each individual extract is properly cited for easy referencing within the Jesuit Relations, allowing the book to be used as a companion to the Relations or as a stand-alone reference. Six original campaign maps are provided, as well as three helpful appendices:


Appendix A - A detailed chronology of events from 1650–1675;

Appendix B - A synonymy of obscure tribal names contained in the volume;

Appendix C - Nearly 50 brief biographies of individuals (French governors, native

      chiefs, and missionaries) mentioned prominently in the extracts.

Iroquois Wars II continues the chronicle of the rise of the Iroquois Confederacy during the “Beaver Wars” of the 17th century, using primary source extracts from the Jesuit Relations. The accounts included in this volume cover the incredible series of victories won by the Iroquois over neighboring tribes following the defeat and collapse of their Huron enemies in 1650. Iroquois war parties fought wide-ranging campaigns against enemy tribes and Europeans alike in practically every state east of the Mississippi. In doing so, they destroyed or displaced dozens of tribes, many of which are known to history by their names alone. Extracts covering the stunning defeat of the Neutral confederacy in the 1650s and of the long war with the Susquehannocks (Andaste) are prominently featured. Several detailed extracts covering the dramatic war between the Iroquois and the Eries are also included, along with numerous accounts of the French invasions of Iroquoia in the 1660s and attempts to forge a lasting peace.

   An introduction written by the editors helps place the extracts in their historical context and provides a list of further reading material. Each individual extract is properly cited for easy referencing within the Jesuit Relations, allowing the book to be used as a companion to the Relations or as a stand-alone reference. Six original campaign maps are provided, as well as three helpful appendices:


Appendix A - A detailed chronology of events from 1650–1675;

Appendix B - A synonymy of obscure tribal names contained in the volume;

Appendix C - Nearly 50 brief biographies of individuals (French governors, native

      chiefs, and missionaries) mentioned prominently in the extracts.

From the author of 1491—the best-selling study of the pre-Columbian Americas—a deeply engaging new history of the most momentous biological event since the death of the dinosaurs.

More than 200 million years ago, geological forces split apart the continents. Isolated from each other, the two halves of the world developed radically different suites of plants and animals. When Christopher Columbus set foot in the Americas, he ended that separation at a stroke. Driven by the economic goal of establishing trade with China, he accidentally set off an ecological convulsion as European vessels carried thousands of species to new homes across the oceans.

The Columbian Exchange, as researchers call it, is the reason there are tomatoes in Italy, oranges in Florida, chocolates in Switzerland, and chili peppers in Thailand. More important, creatures the colonists knew nothing about hitched along for the ride. Earthworms, mosquitoes, and cockroaches; honeybees, dandelions, and African grasses; bacteria, fungi, and viruses; rats of every description—all of them rushed like eager tourists into lands that had never seen their like before, changing lives and landscapes across the planet.

Eight decades after Columbus, a Spaniard named Legazpi succeeded where Columbus had failed. He sailed west to establish continual trade with China, then the richest, most powerful country in the world. In Manila, a city Legazpi founded, silver from the Americas, mined by African and Indian slaves, was sold to Asians in return for silk for Europeans. It was the first time that goods and people from every corner of the globe were connected in a single worldwide exchange. Much as Columbus created a new world biologically, Legazpi and the Spanish empire he served created a new world economically.

As Charles C. Mann shows, the Columbian Exchange underlies much of subsequent human history. Presenting the latest research by ecologists, anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians, Mann shows how the creation of this worldwide network of ecological and economic exchange fostered the rise of Europe, devastated imperial China, convulsed Africa, and for two centuries made Mexico City—where Asia, Europe, and the new frontier of the Americas dynamically interacted—the center of the world. In such encounters, he uncovers the germ of today’s fiercest political disputes, from immigration to trade policy to culture wars.

In 1493, Charles Mann gives us an eye-opening scientific interpretation of our past, unequaled in its authority and fascination.
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