Adapting Gender: Mexican Feminisms from Literature to Film

SUNY Press
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 Demonstrates how film adaptations intersect with feminist discourse in neoliberal Mexico.
Adapting Gender offers a cogent introduction to Mexico’s film industry, the history of women’s filmmaking in Mexico, a new approach to adaptation as a potential feminist strategy, and a cultural history of generational changes in Mexico.Ilana Dann Luna examines how adapted films have the potential to subvert not only the intentions of the source text, but how they can also interrupt the hegemony of gender stereotypes in a broader socio-political context. Luna follows the industrial shifts that began with Salinas de Gortari’s presidency, which made the long 1990s the precise moment in which subversive filmmakers, particularly women, were able to participate more fully in the industry and portrayed the lived experiences of women and non-gender-conforming men. The analysis focuses on Busi Cortés’s El secreto de Romelia (1988), an adaptation of Rosario Castellanos’s short novel El viudo Román (1964); Sabina Berman and Isabelle Tardán’s Entre Pancho Villa y una mujer desnuda (1996), an adaptation of Berman’s own play, Entre Villa y una mujer desnuda (1992); Guita Schyfter’s Novia que te vea (1993), an adaptation of Rosa Nissán’s eponymous novel (1992); and Jaime Humberto Hermosillo’s De noche vienes, Esmeralda (1997), an adaptation of Elena Poniatowska’s short story “De noche vienes” (1979). These adapted texts established a significant alternative to monolithic notions of national (gendered) identity, while critiquing, updating, and even queering, notions of feminism in the Mexican context.

Adapting Gender demonstrates Luna’s considerable skills as a scholar. She deftly carries out a careful analysis of the literary and cinematic texts, putting them in the context of the evolving publishing and film industries. Written in a lively and engaging style, this is a unique synthesis of the evolution of feminism and the roles women have had—indeed, at times, been limited to—in Mexico and what this has meant for their creative output.” — Niamh Thornton, author of Revolution and Rebellion in Mexican Film
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About the author

 Ilana Dann Luna is Assistant Professor of Spanish and Latin American Studies at Arizona State University.

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Additional Information

SUNY Press
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Published on
Jan 1, 2018
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Literary Criticism / Caribbean & Latin American
Performing Arts / Film / History & Criticism
Social Science / Feminism & Feminist Theory
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"Boricua is what Puerto Ricans call one another as a term of endearment, respect, and cultural affirmation; it is a timeless declaration that transcends gender and color. Boricua is a powerful word that tells the origin and history of the Puerto Rican people."
--From the Introduction
From the sun-drenched beaches of a beautiful, flamboyan-covered island to the cool, hard pavement of the fierce South Bronx, the remarkable journey of the Puerto Rican people is a rich story full of daring defiance, courageous strength, fierce passions, and dangerous politics--and it is a story that continues to be told today. Long ignored by Anglo literature studies, here are more than fifty selections of poetry, fiction, plays, essays, monologues, screenplays, and speeches from some of the most vibrant and original voices in Puerto Rican literature.
* Jack Agüeros * Miguel Algarín * Julia de Burgos * Pedro Albizu Campos * Lucky CienFuegos * Judith Ortiz Cofer * Jesus Colon * Victor Hern ndez Cruz * José de Diego * Martin Espada * Sandra Maria Esteves * Ronald Fernandez * José Luis Gonzalez * Migene Gonzalez-Wippler * Maria Graniela de Pruetzel * Pablo Guzman * Felipe Luciano * René Marqués * Luis Muñoz Marín * Nicholasa Mohr * Aurora Levins Morales * Martita Morales * Rosario Morales * Willie Perdomo * Pedro Pietri * Miguel Piñero * Reinaldo Povod * Freddie Prinze * Geraldo Rivera * Abraham Rodriguez, Jr. * Clara E. Rodriguez * Esmeralda Santiago * Roberto Santiago * Pedro Juan Soto * Piri Thomas * Edwin Torres * José Torres * Joseph B. Vasquez * Ana Lydia Vega

From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Although Niggli is perhaps best known for her fiction and folk plays, this anthology recovers her historical dramas, most of which have been long out of print or were never published. These plays are deeply concerned with the aftermath of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, imagining its implications for Mexico, Mexican Americans, and U.S.-Mexico relations. Included are Mexican Silhouettes (1928), Singing Valley (1936), The Cry of Dolores (1936), The Fair God (1936), Soldadera (1938), This is Villa! (1939), and The Ring of General Macias (1943). These works reflect on the making of history and often portray the Revolution through the lens of women’s experiences.
Also included in this volume are an extensive critical introduction to Niggli, a chronology of her life and writings, plus letters and reviews by, to, and about Josefina Niggli. that provide illuminating context for the plays. Best Books for Special Interests, selected by the American Association of School Librarians, and Outstanding Book, selected by the Public Library Association “The Best of the Best of the University Presses: Books You Should Know About” presented at the 2008 American Library Association Annual Conference
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