Purple Heart

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When Private Matt Duffy wakes up in an army hospital in Iraq, he's honored with a Purple Heart. But he doesn't feel like a hero.

There's a memory that haunts him: an image of a young Iraqi boy as a bullet hits his chest. Matt can't shake the feeling that he was somehow involved in his death. But because of a head injury he sustained just moments after the boy was shot, Matt can't quite put all the pieces together.

Eventually Matt is sent back into combat with his squad—Justin, Wolf, and Charlene—the soldiers who have become his family during his time in Iraq. He just wants to go back to being the soldier he once was. But he sees potential threats everywhere and lives in fear of not being able to pull the trigger when the time comes. In combat there is no black-and-white, and Matt soon discovers that the notion of who is guilty is very complicated indeed.

National Book Award Finalist Patricia McCormick has written a visceral and compelling portrait of life in a war zone, where loyalty is valued above all, and death is terrifyingly commonplace.

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Patricia McCormick
A teenager's attempt to maintain psychological integrity-the maladaptive coping mechanisms she uses as a way to stay alive and her path to recovery. You say it's up to me to do the talking. You lean forward, place a box of tissues in front of me and your black leather chair groans, like a living thing. Like the cow it used to be before somebody killed it and turned it into a chair in a shrink's office in a loony bin. Fifteen-year old Callie is so withdrawn that she's not speaking to anyone -including her therapist at the residential treatment facility where her parents and doctor send her after discovering that she cuts herself. Her story unfolds primarily through dramatic monologues, gradually revealing the family turmoil that led to her self-destructive behavior. Her little brother, Sam, is ill -he nearly died in her care. Since Sam's illness, Callie's mother has become so worried and fragile, she rarely leaves the house; she sees danger everywhere. Her father has responded to the psychological and financial stress of Sam's illness by disappearing into his work, and when that doesn't work, into his drinking. None of this is clear at first, though, especially not to Callie. Only after a cutting incident that scares her, does Callie begin talking -to her therapist and the other girls at Sea Pines. Cut alternates between scenes of life inside the institution with its strange rules and characters and a series of exchanges between Callie and her therapist in which she addresses the therapist only as you. Callie's efforts to understand herself and her family illuminate her process of recovery honestly and with hope. Cut provides an insightful look at the psychology of cutting -a form of self-abuse an estimated 2 million teenage girls inflict on themselves.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Harper Collins
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Published on
Sep 1, 2009
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9780061948763
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Young Adult Fiction / Historical / Military & Wars
Young Adult Fiction / People & Places / Middle East
Young Adult Fiction / Social Themes / Death & Dying
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Patricia McCormick
A teenager's attempt to maintain psychological integrity-the maladaptive coping mechanisms she uses as a way to stay alive and her path to recovery. You say it's up to me to do the talking. You lean forward, place a box of tissues in front of me and your black leather chair groans, like a living thing. Like the cow it used to be before somebody killed it and turned it into a chair in a shrink's office in a loony bin. Fifteen-year old Callie is so withdrawn that she's not speaking to anyone -including her therapist at the residential treatment facility where her parents and doctor send her after discovering that she cuts herself. Her story unfolds primarily through dramatic monologues, gradually revealing the family turmoil that led to her self-destructive behavior. Her little brother, Sam, is ill -he nearly died in her care. Since Sam's illness, Callie's mother has become so worried and fragile, she rarely leaves the house; she sees danger everywhere. Her father has responded to the psychological and financial stress of Sam's illness by disappearing into his work, and when that doesn't work, into his drinking. None of this is clear at first, though, especially not to Callie. Only after a cutting incident that scares her, does Callie begin talking -to her therapist and the other girls at Sea Pines. Cut alternates between scenes of life inside the institution with its strange rules and characters and a series of exchanges between Callie and her therapist in which she addresses the therapist only as you. Callie's efforts to understand herself and her family illuminate her process of recovery honestly and with hope. Cut provides an insightful look at the psychology of cutting -a form of self-abuse an estimated 2 million teenage girls inflict on themselves.
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