Beauty in the City: The Ashcan School

SUNY Press
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 Presents a major new interpretation of the Ashcan School of Art, arguing that these artists made the working-class city at the turn of the century a subject for beautiful art.

At the beginning of the twentieth century the Ashcan School of Art blazed onto the art scene, introducing a revolutionary vision of New York City. In contrast to the elite artists who painted the upper class bedecked in finery, in front of magnificent structures, or the progressive reformers who photographed the city as a slum, hopeless and full of despair, the Ashcan School held the unique belief that the industrial working-class city was a fit subject for great art. In Beauty in the City, Robert A. Slayton illustrates how these artists portrayed the working classes with respect and gloried in the drama of the subways and excavation sites, the office towers, and immigrant housing. Their art captured the emerging metropolis in all its facets, with its potent machinery and its class, ethnic, and gender issues. By exposing the realities of this new, modern America through their art—expressed in what they chose to draw, not in how they drew it—they created one of the great American art forms.

“A delight for the eyes, a treat for city lovers, and a fine example of how historians can use art, Beauty in the City will enrich such fields as urban history, art history, the history of New York City, and America in the twentieth century. Robert Slayton has identified a group of artists who saw in the gritty details of city life real beauty and social meaning.” — Hasia R. Diner, author of Roads Taken: The Great Jewish Migrations to the New World and the Peddlers Who Forged the Way

“A century ago, the Ashcan painters created an art that was of, by, and for urban Americans—in all their exhilarating pluralism. Robert Slayton analyzes and celebrates their accomplishment in a work that combines brilliant scholarship and a profound passion for his subject. To his great credit, he reveals ‘the beauty already there.’” — Michael Kazin, author of War Against War: The American Fight for Peace, 1914–1918

“With great narrative skill and finely drawn characters, Robert Slayton paints a vivid picture of New York and the art world in the early twentieth century. He reminds us that these artists and the city they inhabited continue to influence our perspective—about class, about gender, about race—a century later. This book is a wonderful, vibrant look at a forgotten part of our history.” — Terry Golway, author of Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics
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About the author

 Robert A. Slayton is Henry Salvatori Professor of American Values and Traditions at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Empire Statesman: The Rise and Redemption of Al Smith.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Jun 21, 2017
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Pages
216
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ISBN
9781438466439
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / History / Modern (late 19th Century to 1945)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Book 4
A founder of French Impressionist painting and the most prolific practitioner of the movement's philosophy of expressing one's perceptions before nature, Claude Monet created a large body of works, developing his own method of producing repeated studies of the same motif in a series, whilst changing canvases with the shift in light. Delphi’s Masters of Art Series presents the world’s first digital e-Art books, allowing readers to explore the works of great artists in comprehensive detail. This volume presents over 500 paintings of the Impressionist master. For all art lovers, this stunning collection offers a beautiful feast of images by one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. (Version 2)
Features:
* over 500 paintings, indexed and arranged in chronological order
* special ‘Highlights’ section, with concise introductions to the masterpieces, giving valuable contextual information
* beautiful 'detail' images, allowing you to explore Monet's celebrated works
* numerous images relating to Monet’s life and works
* learn about the history of the Impressionists and the celebrated works that shaped the art movement in the detailed biography THE FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS by Camille Mauclair
* hundreds of images in stunning colour - highly recommended for tablets, iPhone and iPad users, or as a valuable reference tool on eReaders

Please visit: www.delphiclassics.com for more information and to browse our range of titles.

CONTENTS:

The Highlights
LUNCHEON ON THE GRASS
SELF PORTRAIT WITH A BERET
THE TERRACE AT SAINTE-ADRESSE
WOMEN IN THE GARDEN
BATHERS-AT-LA-GRENOUILLÈRE
ON THE BANK OF THE SEINE, BENNECOURT
THE MAGPIE
POPPIES BLOOMING
WOMAN WITH A PARASOL
IMPRESSION, SUNRISE
GARE SAINT LAZARE, ARRIVAL OF A TRAIN
IN THE WOODS AT GIVERNY BLANCHE HOSCHEDÉ
HAYSTACKS, (SUNSET)
ROUEN CATHEDRAL, FAÇADE (SUNSET)
BRIDGE OVER A POND OF WATER LILIES
HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT, LONDON
WATER LILIES
THE GRAND CANAL, VENICE
NYMPHEAS
THE ROSE-WAY IN GIVERNY

The Paintings
THE PAINTINGS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PAINTINGS

The Biography
THE FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS by Camille Mauclair

Please visit: www.delphiclassics.com for more information
Anne-Marie O'Connor
The spellbinding story, part fairy tale, part suspense, of Gustav Klimt’s Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer, one of the most emblematic portraits of its time; of the beautiful, seductive Viennese Jewish salon hostess who sat for it; the notorious artist who painted it; the now vanished turn-of-the-century Vienna that shaped it; and the strange twisted fate that befell it.
 
The Lady in Gold, considered an unforgettable masterpiece, one of the twentieth century’s most recognizable paintings, made headlines all over the world when Ronald Lauder bought it for $135 million a century after Klimt, the most famous Austrian painter of his time, completed the society portrait.
 
Anne-Marie O’Connor, writer for The Washington Post, formerly of the Los Angeles Times, tells the galvanizing story of the Lady in Gold, Adele Bloch-Bauer, a dazzling Viennese Jewish society figure; daughter of the head of one of the largest banks in the Hapsburg Empire, head of the Oriental Railway, whose Orient Express went from Berlin to Constantinople; wife of Ferdinand Bauer, sugar-beet baron.
 
The Bloch-Bauers were art patrons, and Adele herself was considered a rebel of fin de siècle Vienna (she wanted to be educated, a notion considered “degenerate” in a society that believed women being out in the world went against their feminine “nature”). The author describes how Adele inspired the portrait and how Klimt made more than a hundred sketches of her—simple pencil drawings on thin manila paper.
 
And O’Connor writes of Klimt himself, son of a failed gold engraver, shunned by arts bureaucrats, called an artistic heretic in his time, a genius in ours.
 
She writes of the Nazis confiscating the portrait of Adele from the Bloch-Bauers’ grand palais; of the Austrian government putting the painting on display, stripping Adele’s Jewish surname from it so that no clues to her identity (nor any hint of her Jewish origins) would be revealed. Nazi officials called the painting, The Lady in Gold and proudly exhibited it in Vienna’s Baroque Belvedere Palace, consecrated in the 1930s as a Nazi institution.
 
The author writes of the painting, inspired by the Byzantine mosaics Klimt had studied in Italy, with their exotic symbols and swirls, the subject an idol in a golden shrine.
 
We see how, sixty years after it was stolen by the Nazis, the Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer became the subject of a decade-long litigation between the Austrian government and the Bloch-Bauer heirs, how and why the U.S. Supreme Court became involved in the case, and how the Court’s decision had profound ramifications in the art world.
 
A riveting social history; an illuminating and haunting look at turn-of-the-century Vienna; a brilliant portrait of the evolution of a painter; a masterfully told tale of suspense. And at the heart of it, the Lady in Gold—the shimmering painting, and its equally irresistible subject, the fate of each forever intertwined.
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