Boundary Lines: Philosophy and Postcolonialism

SUNY Press
Free sample

Systematically addresses the philosophical implications of the postcolonial.

In this book, Emanuela Fornari systematically examines the philosophical implications of postcolonial studies. She considers postcolonial critique not as a school or a current of thought but rather as a multiform constellation that—from the celebrated Orientalism of Edward Said to the contributions of authors like Homi Bhabha, Gayatri Spivak, Ranajit Guha, and Dipesh Chakrabarty—has called into question the assumptions that underlie key concepts in the history of philosophy. Fornari addresses themes such as history and memory, borders, the subject, and translation, engaging classical authors such as Kant, Hegel, and Marx alongside more contemporary theorizations by authors such as Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Étienne Balibar, and Jacques Rancière.

“Fornari’s book is purposeful in its construction, framed by themes she puts into motion and in which each considered thinker is set. The result is an investigation of philosophy and the postcolonial that does not rely on familiar associations and gestures, but rather rigorous, original theorizing of key concepts. This is a compelling book that displays mature, important thinking on some of our most pressing philosophical issues.” — John E. Drabinski, coeditor of Between Levinas and Heidegger

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About the author

 Emanuela Fornari is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Roma Tre, Italy and has published several books, including Modernity Out of Joint: Global Democracy and Asian Values in Jürgen Habermas and Amartya K. SenIain Halliday is Associate Professor of English Language and Translation at the University of Catania, Italy. He is the author of Huck Finn in Italian, Pinocchio in English: Theory and Praxis of Literary Translation.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Dec 27, 2018
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781438474137
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Emigration & Immigration
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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